Slip in polls for Labour and Little a bad sign after policy releases

EDITORIAL

The Labour Party will be highly disappointed with the latest Colmar Brunton One News opinion poll, for more than one reason.

The first poll since the result of the flag referendum has National up three points to 50 percent and able to govern alone, while Labour has fallen 4 to 28 percent — its lowest level since the 2014 election at which it recorded 25.

It would be galling for Labour that the result of the flag referendum has failed to impact on the Government and John Key, its main sponsor, who is down just one to 39 percent as preferred prime minister.

What is most disappointing however is that Labour has fallen below the crucial 30 percent level, despite releasing a series of major policies in the past few weeks.

In the long run it is the failure of these policies to provide momentum that is far more serious than the, probably fleeting, effect of the referendum.

Labour put a lot of time and thought into its future of work policy but the media and general public seem to have focused only on the suggestion of a minimum universal wage, which was seen as being too costly.

Labour leader Andrew Little has recognised this, saying he understands the need for clearer messages.

He accepts he had a bad couple of weeks with things like the perceived suggestion that Chinese chefs might be keeping jobs from New Zealand workers. The fact list MP Clayton Cosgrove has announced he is standing down did not help at this time.

Little himself unfortunately seems to be failing to get recognition from the public. He was down to 7 percent as preferred prime minister which is embarrassing for the leader of one of New Zealand’s major parties, and behind Winston Peters who was on 10.

All is far from lost for Labour. There is still time for the party to refocus on its jobs policy and promote things like its call for three years free tertiary education, which should be popular. But it must make sure the message is clear and avoid any missteps in the way it is delivered.

The Labour Party will be highly disappointed with the latest Colmar Brunton One News opinion poll, for more than one reason.

The first poll since the result of the flag referendum has National up three points to 50 percent and able to govern alone, while Labour has fallen 4 to 28 percent — its lowest level since the 2014 election at which it recorded 25.

It would be galling for Labour that the result of the flag referendum has failed to impact on the Government and John Key, its main sponsor, who is down just one to 39 percent as preferred prime minister.

What is most disappointing however is that Labour has fallen below the crucial 30 percent level, despite releasing a series of major policies in the past few weeks.

In the long run it is the failure of these policies to provide momentum that is far more serious than the, probably fleeting, effect of the referendum.

Labour put a lot of time and thought into its future of work policy but the media and general public seem to have focused only on the suggestion of a minimum universal wage, which was seen as being too costly.

Labour leader Andrew Little has recognised this, saying he understands the need for clearer messages.

He accepts he had a bad couple of weeks with things like the perceived suggestion that Chinese chefs might be keeping jobs from New Zealand workers. The fact list MP Clayton Cosgrove has announced he is standing down did not help at this time.

Little himself unfortunately seems to be failing to get recognition from the public. He was down to 7 percent as preferred prime minister which is embarrassing for the leader of one of New Zealand’s major parties, and behind Winston Peters who was on 10.

All is far from lost for Labour. There is still time for the party to refocus on its jobs policy and promote things like its call for three years free tertiary education, which should be popular. But it must make sure the message is clear and avoid any missteps in the way it is delivered.

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