Port company taking steps to limit discharge, rubbish issues

EDITORIAL

Eastland Port has had something of a mixed week with a fine from Gisborne District Council for a discharge from its lower wharfside logyard, but praise for its response to rubbish escaping from its southern logyard on to Kaiti Beach.

The port was fined $750 by the council for a discharge that saw a reddy-brown pool form in the inner harbour, similar to the one seen (and smelt) by a large number of people at a Christmas function at the Gisborne Tatapouri Sports Fishing Club last year.

There was also a discharge from the upper logyard, but that was within its consent — while the wharfside logyard has no consent, making the discharge a breach of the regional coastal plan.

The difficulty is that the wharfside yard operated for some time without a consent. It is now not being used until a consent is obtained.

The sooner that is done to clear the situation up the better. Eastland Port has just completed a costly hearing to obtain variations in its conditions for the monitoring of water quality around the yard. The independent commissioner was told at the hearing that a consent for the wharfside yard would be sought in the near future.

There is a complication in that the inner harbour is a crayfish nursery and Maori have in the past sought strict conditions, at the very least for any discharge into the harbour — as they did with the southern logyard.

It is good therefore to see Eastland Port respond so quickly, and with a good solution, after people carrying out a clean-up on Kaiti Beach found plastic tags which had fallen off logs and other waste that might have come from the port area.

The port company’s response is to give waste bags to truck drivers, have rubbish bins near the log scaling yards and add shade cloth to fencing that will collect wind-blown litter. A roster of volunteers will also do monthly litter collections on Kaiti Beach.

These are good, practical moves and are probably as much as the company could do. It will be great if the general public using the beach also play their part.

Eastland Port has had something of a mixed week with a fine from Gisborne District Council for a discharge from its lower wharfside logyard, but praise for its response to rubbish escaping from its southern logyard on to Kaiti Beach.

The port was fined $750 by the council for a discharge that saw a reddy-brown pool form in the inner harbour, similar to the one seen (and smelt) by a large number of people at a Christmas function at the Gisborne Tatapouri Sports Fishing Club last year.

There was also a discharge from the upper logyard, but that was within its consent — while the wharfside logyard has no consent, making the discharge a breach of the regional coastal plan.

The difficulty is that the wharfside yard operated for some time without a consent. It is now not being used until a consent is obtained.

The sooner that is done to clear the situation up the better. Eastland Port has just completed a costly hearing to obtain variations in its conditions for the monitoring of water quality around the yard. The independent commissioner was told at the hearing that a consent for the wharfside yard would be sought in the near future.

There is a complication in that the inner harbour is a crayfish nursery and Maori have in the past sought strict conditions, at the very least for any discharge into the harbour — as they did with the southern logyard.

It is good therefore to see Eastland Port respond so quickly, and with a good solution, after people carrying out a clean-up on Kaiti Beach found plastic tags which had fallen off logs and other waste that might have come from the port area.

The port company’s response is to give waste bags to truck drivers, have rubbish bins near the log scaling yards and add shade cloth to fencing that will collect wind-blown litter. A roster of volunteers will also do monthly litter collections on Kaiti Beach.

These are good, practical moves and are probably as much as the company could do. It will be great if the general public using the beach also play their part.

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