Warmer weather being enjoyed all around, noticeably on new walkway

EDITORIAL

The first day of spring has come and gone and the district is swinging towards summer mode, as people start to get out and about enjoying the warmer weather.

With winter sports fast drawing to a close and summer sports for the most part not yet under way, the next few weeks are a time that people will be concentrating on leisure.

One place that could be seen at the weekend was the Oneroa walkway, which is becoming so popular it is almost going to need traffic police. Weekend walkers would also have been encouraged to see work started on the new Beacon Street extension that will create a link from the Oneroa route to the cycle/walkway running beside the Waikanae Stream to Alfred Cox Park.

It is a little sad for those using the river walkway to see Titirangi/Kaiti Hill looking so brown and desolate on the part facing the port, but this is because of tree clearing for a major $1.3 million revegetation project that had a target of 8500 plants in the Rakaiatane site for this season.

Unfortunately, because of a drier-than-usual winter, the council has advised there could be a loss of 15 percent of these plants.

Regular walkers will look forward to seeing the hill green again, this time in native plants, as a transformation begins leading up to the Te Ha 2019 commemorations.

There is great interest too in whether the council will support a long-proposed Taruheru cycle/walkway after a feasibility study on it is completed. The council had decided on an Aberdeen Road route instead, but opted for further investigation after strong calls for that from the public — backed by Mayor Meng Foon, who also conducted his own research.

The Wainui cycle/walkway is another popular asset. Anecdotally there is also support for an eventual extension of the Oneroa cycle/walkway out towards the mouth of the Waipaoa River.

The council deserves credit for its commitment to making the city as user-friendly as possible to walkers and cyclists, which annual polling shows is extremely popular with the public.

The first day of spring has come and gone and the district is swinging towards summer mode, as people start to get out and about enjoying the warmer weather.

With winter sports fast drawing to a close and summer sports for the most part not yet under way, the next few weeks are a time that people will be concentrating on leisure.

One place that could be seen at the weekend was the Oneroa walkway, which is becoming so popular it is almost going to need traffic police. Weekend walkers would also have been encouraged to see work started on the new Beacon Street extension that will create a link from the Oneroa route to the cycle/walkway running beside the Waikanae Stream to Alfred Cox Park.

It is a little sad for those using the river walkway to see Titirangi/Kaiti Hill looking so brown and desolate on the part facing the port, but this is because of tree clearing for a major $1.3 million revegetation project that had a target of 8500 plants in the Rakaiatane site for this season.

Unfortunately, because of a drier-than-usual winter, the council has advised there could be a loss of 15 percent of these plants.

Regular walkers will look forward to seeing the hill green again, this time in native plants, as a transformation begins leading up to the Te Ha 2019 commemorations.

There is great interest too in whether the council will support a long-proposed Taruheru cycle/walkway after a feasibility study on it is completed. The council had decided on an Aberdeen Road route instead, but opted for further investigation after strong calls for that from the public — backed by Mayor Meng Foon, who also conducted his own research.

The Wainui cycle/walkway is another popular asset. Anecdotally there is also support for an eventual extension of the Oneroa cycle/walkway out towards the mouth of the Waipaoa River.

The council deserves credit for its commitment to making the city as user-friendly as possible to walkers and cyclists, which annual polling shows is extremely popular with the public.

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