Farewell ‘16; roll on challenges and promise of 2017

EDITORIAL

Time to say goodbye to 2016, a year that has been a mixture of highs and lows with not a few controversies thrown in to spice the mixture.

The year ended on a sad note with the Wharerata bus crash and deaths of two Tongans following hard on the heels of the crash of a topdressing plane with the loss of two lives and a major power outage. These were two examples of the human tragedies that fill the pages of the Herald each year. Things like road accidents, dog attacks and assaults are constants, joined this year by a string of house fires.

Some things never seem to change. The Gisborne-Napier rail link debate went on for another 12 months with a final decision promised early next year.

Television news made its annual visit to report on a major storm that fortunately never arrived.

The state of the district’s roads, particularly State Highway 35, kept correspondents busy.

Naturally Gisborne District Council was a centre of attention with major developments like the demolition of its administration buildings and a decision not to automatically reappoint chief executive Judy Campbell.

The local body elections saw changes with three new council members and two existing ones defeated while Mayor Meng Foon won a sixth term.

Eastland Community Trust and the Eastland Group went from strength to strength. The trust’s equity rose by $20m to $295m with earnings of $11.1m — $7.5m from the group. It will be an even bigger player in the future.

Local woman and ex Herald reporter Tusha Penny will head the Waitemata Police District.

As always sport is a huge part of Gisborne life with a list of successes too numerous to fully mention. Shannon McIlroy won the world lawn bowls singles title and local paddlers were winners at the world outrigger paddling championships (waka ama).

Locals captured national titles in a variety of sports from swimming to jet sprints.

Time to say hello then to 2017 with all its promise and challenges and to give our best wishes for a happy and prosperous New Year.

Time to say goodbye to 2016, a year that has been a mixture of highs and lows with not a few controversies thrown in to spice the mixture.

The year ended on a sad note with the Wharerata bus crash and deaths of two Tongans following hard on the heels of the crash of a topdressing plane with the loss of two lives and a major power outage. These were two examples of the human tragedies that fill the pages of the Herald each year. Things like road accidents, dog attacks and assaults are constants, joined this year by a string of house fires.

Some things never seem to change. The Gisborne-Napier rail link debate went on for another 12 months with a final decision promised early next year.

Television news made its annual visit to report on a major storm that fortunately never arrived.

The state of the district’s roads, particularly State Highway 35, kept correspondents busy.

Naturally Gisborne District Council was a centre of attention with major developments like the demolition of its administration buildings and a decision not to automatically reappoint chief executive Judy Campbell.

The local body elections saw changes with three new council members and two existing ones defeated while Mayor Meng Foon won a sixth term.

Eastland Community Trust and the Eastland Group went from strength to strength. The trust’s equity rose by $20m to $295m with earnings of $11.1m — $7.5m from the group. It will be an even bigger player in the future.

Local woman and ex Herald reporter Tusha Penny will head the Waitemata Police District.

As always sport is a huge part of Gisborne life with a list of successes too numerous to fully mention. Shannon McIlroy won the world lawn bowls singles title and local paddlers were winners at the world outrigger paddling championships (waka ama).

Locals captured national titles in a variety of sports from swimming to jet sprints.

Time to say hello then to 2017 with all its promise and challenges and to give our best wishes for a happy and prosperous New Year.

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Winston Moreton - 2 years ago
Eastland Community Trust is a carbuncle on the neck of all local electricity consumers. The trustees make it hard to attract new families and/or new commerce. ECT and the Eastland Group have a monopoly so no kudos for taking millions out of our local economy and investing out of our district.

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