Odd cybercrime priorities

LETTER

The withdrawal of the NZ Interpol rep from the research and investigation centre in Singapore is a good example that government priorities may be at odds with the needs of New Zealand business and voters. We’re still going to spend $250 million on a cybercrime strategy though.

Forgive me if I’m wrong, but surely an international research agency would have more information and more varied insights by working with potentially 190 other law enforcement agencies.

It seems we are penny-pinching on a very important link while spending a substantial amount on lip service. This could be at greater cost both financially and in non-recoverable information loss.

Cybercrime affects government security yet we are willing to spend $20 billion (80 times the amount) of taxpayers’ money on war toys as part of our five eyes commitment —but will not share in an international agency to fight cybercrime.

Emerging cyber attacks are evolving and permeate all sectors of our society. We need the technology to combat that and keep pace with the attacks. We can’t sit on our hands and be followers.

Mary-Ann de Kort

The withdrawal of the NZ Interpol rep from the research and investigation centre in Singapore is a good example that government priorities may be at odds with the needs of New Zealand business and voters. We’re still going to spend $250 million on a cybercrime strategy though.

Forgive me if I’m wrong, but surely an international research agency would have more information and more varied insights by working with potentially 190 other law enforcement agencies.

It seems we are penny-pinching on a very important link while spending a substantial amount on lip service. This could be at greater cost both financially and in non-recoverable information loss.

Cybercrime affects government security yet we are willing to spend $20 billion (80 times the amount) of taxpayers’ money on war toys as part of our five eyes commitment —but will not share in an international agency to fight cybercrime.

Emerging cyber attacks are evolving and permeate all sectors of our society. We need the technology to combat that and keep pace with the attacks. We can’t sit on our hands and be followers.

Mary-Ann de Kort

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