No burkas makes sense

LETTER

“No burkas” sign draws Human Rights complaint, April 15 story.

In Saturday’s Gisborne Herald we read a story where a sign states “No burkas” in an Avondale shop which sells coffee and secondhand jewellery. And then we read an Auckland councillor considers this could be an abuse of human rights.

Cathy Casey, who represents the Albert-Eden-Roskill ward, told the New Zealand Herald a local woman sent her a photo of the sign where she thought “that’s not right” and believed it may be discriminatory and illegal to stop someone from entering a shop because they are wearing a burka. Sorry, that’s only part if it and distorts why the sign is up.

It alarms me that a city councillor, who is paid by city ratepayers, gets it so wrong and wastes everybody’s time and money making a complaint to the Human Rights Commission.

The sign says shop policy is: “No burkas, No hoodies, No sunglasses, No helmets.”

Councillor Cathy Casey focuses with a pair of blinkers on, because the reason this sign is displayed is so that cameras can identify shoplifters. Plenty of shops have similar policies, so that constant shoplifters can be identified on camera.

Concerning the burkas, France and other countries have been forced to legislate to ban them for other reasons as some women wearing burkas have carried suicide bombs and killed lots of people like this. This is a health and safety issue overseas.

So in the meantime, New Zealand does not have this problem but it may happen some time in the future. The above is totally legal in my opinion. I’m sure most readers have seen shoplifting about town, on TV and in the papers. This is a consequence of the changing times of our society.

Alain Jorion

“No burkas” sign draws Human Rights complaint, April 15 story.

In Saturday’s Gisborne Herald we read a story where a sign states “No burkas” in an Avondale shop which sells coffee and secondhand jewellery. And then we read an Auckland councillor considers this could be an abuse of human rights.

Cathy Casey, who represents the Albert-Eden-Roskill ward, told the New Zealand Herald a local woman sent her a photo of the sign where she thought “that’s not right” and believed it may be discriminatory and illegal to stop someone from entering a shop because they are wearing a burka. Sorry, that’s only part if it and distorts why the sign is up.

It alarms me that a city councillor, who is paid by city ratepayers, gets it so wrong and wastes everybody’s time and money making a complaint to the Human Rights Commission.

The sign says shop policy is: “No burkas, No hoodies, No sunglasses, No helmets.”

Councillor Cathy Casey focuses with a pair of blinkers on, because the reason this sign is displayed is so that cameras can identify shoplifters. Plenty of shops have similar policies, so that constant shoplifters can be identified on camera.

Concerning the burkas, France and other countries have been forced to legislate to ban them for other reasons as some women wearing burkas have carried suicide bombs and killed lots of people like this. This is a health and safety issue overseas.

So in the meantime, New Zealand does not have this problem but it may happen some time in the future. The above is totally legal in my opinion. I’m sure most readers have seen shoplifting about town, on TV and in the papers. This is a consequence of the changing times of our society.

Alain Jorion

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Lara Meyer - 1 month ago
No Muslim women have carried out a suicide bombing mission in France whilst wearing a burqa.

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