Preventing overflows of sewage council’s priority

LETTER

Re: Wake up council, smell the sewage, April 13 letter.

Preventing sewage overflows into our rivers and on to beaches is a priority for GDC. On a very basic level, discharges of raw sewage occur for two main reasons: faults; and rainwater entering our wastewater system. We should not have a rainfall-affected wastewater system.

Rainfall should not enter our wastewater system but, unfortunately, it does. And in huge quantities. City households should have private stormwater infrastructure to direct rooftop rainfall into the public stormwater system. Many, too many, do not (for a variety of reasons). Instead, these households — knowingly or unknowingly — dump their rooftop rainwater directly into our sewer system. (Rainfall also enters our sewer system in other ways).

Our wastewater system is not designed to take massive inflows of rainwater. This excess of water overwhelms it, and the only way to relieve the pressure (and prevent backflow of sewage into houses) are sewage discharges into rivers.

The council wants a well-functioning wastewater system for our city and they need households to help them: private rooftop rainwater must flow into our stormwater system — never into our wastewater system.

Preventing rainfall from entering our wastewater system will be a giant step towards ending sewer overflows into rivers. This is a priority for GDC right now, known as the DrainWise Project.

AMBER DUNN, Councillor

Re: Wake up council, smell the sewage, April 13 letter.

Preventing sewage overflows into our rivers and on to beaches is a priority for GDC. On a very basic level, discharges of raw sewage occur for two main reasons: faults; and rainwater entering our wastewater system. We should not have a rainfall-affected wastewater system.

Rainfall should not enter our wastewater system but, unfortunately, it does. And in huge quantities. City households should have private stormwater infrastructure to direct rooftop rainfall into the public stormwater system. Many, too many, do not (for a variety of reasons). Instead, these households — knowingly or unknowingly — dump their rooftop rainwater directly into our sewer system. (Rainfall also enters our sewer system in other ways).

Our wastewater system is not designed to take massive inflows of rainwater. This excess of water overwhelms it, and the only way to relieve the pressure (and prevent backflow of sewage into houses) are sewage discharges into rivers.

The council wants a well-functioning wastewater system for our city and they need households to help them: private rooftop rainwater must flow into our stormwater system — never into our wastewater system.

Preventing rainfall from entering our wastewater system will be a giant step towards ending sewer overflows into rivers. This is a priority for GDC right now, known as the DrainWise Project.

AMBER DUNN, Councillor

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