Terror attacks test British resilience and spirit

EDITORIAL

The latest terrorist attacks have placed the UK and its capital city under mental pressure and stress not really seen since the Irish Republican Army terror campaign of the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s, and will be a real test of British resilience and spirit.

The weekend’s atrocity that left seven dead and 48 injured is the third major attack in quick succession and shows so-called Islamic State has now focused on what it sees as soft targets using readily available weapons such as a hired van and knives.

Prime Minister Theresa May said it showed a new trend and one that was particularly difficult for security services to counter because it did not require extensive planning of the sort that exposes the plotters to detection.

The security services inevitably come in for close scrutiny after events like this. It is worth noting that, according to May, they have prevented five credible attacks in the past three months alone.

The latest horror seems to have been timed to create maximum impact on the coming elections on June 8 (UK time).

Inevitably the attacks have become an election issue with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn saying the Conservatives have been policing on the cheap. May has responded with a four point plan to combat extremism.

It is difficult to determine what effect the attacks will have on this week’s election. After early polls indicated a Conservative landslide, Labour has gathered strength recently.

The focus is now shifting to the psychological effects on the general population, particularly in London, one of the world’s most cosmopolitan and diverse cities.

It was interesting to see a big theme of positive memes on social media, especially after the New York Times said Britain was “reeling” after the attacks. Among them was author J.K. Rowling who told the paper not to confuse grief with lack of courage. Others harked back to the spirit of the great city during the Blitz, a far more testing time.

The new challenge is for people to go about their normal daily lives, which will be the ultimate defeat for the terrorists.

The latest terrorist attacks have placed the UK and its capital city under mental pressure and stress not really seen since the Irish Republican Army terror campaign of the 1970s, ’80s and ’90s, and will be a real test of British resilience and spirit.

The weekend’s atrocity that left seven dead and 48 injured is the third major attack in quick succession and shows so-called Islamic State has now focused on what it sees as soft targets using readily available weapons such as a hired van and knives.

Prime Minister Theresa May said it showed a new trend and one that was particularly difficult for security services to counter because it did not require extensive planning of the sort that exposes the plotters to detection.

The security services inevitably come in for close scrutiny after events like this. It is worth noting that, according to May, they have prevented five credible attacks in the past three months alone.

The latest horror seems to have been timed to create maximum impact on the coming elections on June 8 (UK time).

Inevitably the attacks have become an election issue with Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn saying the Conservatives have been policing on the cheap. May has responded with a four point plan to combat extremism.

It is difficult to determine what effect the attacks will have on this week’s election. After early polls indicated a Conservative landslide, Labour has gathered strength recently.

The focus is now shifting to the psychological effects on the general population, particularly in London, one of the world’s most cosmopolitan and diverse cities.

It was interesting to see a big theme of positive memes on social media, especially after the New York Times said Britain was “reeling” after the attacks. Among them was author J.K. Rowling who told the paper not to confuse grief with lack of courage. Others harked back to the spirit of the great city during the Blitz, a far more testing time.

The new challenge is for people to go about their normal daily lives, which will be the ultimate defeat for the terrorists.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you have a better understanding of the first encounters here between Maori and Europeans after the Tuia 250 Ki Turanga commemorations?