Positive ideas for forestry trainers

LETTER

Re: Urgent need for forestry graduates (June 13) and advice on graduate success.

On June 15 the EIT campus director stated they had produced two people to work in the industry in 2016. Turanga Ararau has been silent but I understand they produced 11 — from the same pool of potential workers.

Let’s show the public some real plans and actual results to meet the requirements of an industry that is set to require 40 percent more workers.

In your combined reply, you asked me to give positive ideas after I questioned why EIT made no mention of forestry results in a two-page spread that included Level 2 and 3 certificate students from automotive, agriculture, driving, winemaking, engineering and carpentry.

I am just a forester. If you want to know about cleaner water, less erosion, a greater range of life, safety, return on investment, jobs, the technical nature of our activities, plus a key response to global warming, see a forester.

While we wait for you to publish your own plans, here are some ideas, off the top of my head:

• Forget deficit theorising

• Aim to be the best in NZ

• Total accountability (this is how our businesses run)

• Manage performance

• See Ministry of Education and ITO Competenz for advice, nationwide contacts

• Benchmark and brainstorm with other forestry courses

• Survey your students and prospective students

• Have contractors interview prospective students

• Survey your customers

• Institute a real advisory committee with contractors and forest owners

• Eliminate drug use by students

• Plan, act, review

• Have plans B, C etc with Eastland Wood Council

• Hold forest visit trips (the last one was three years ago!) — not only for school children but anyone interested in work (including from outside the region)

• Use GoPros in training

• Set targets everywhere

• See other good youth trainers, eg rural fire, Waipaoa cadets

• Continuous improvement culture

• Change methods

• A support network for students in work

• Have existing workers on campus, contractors as tutors

• Have mentors, counsellors

• Exciting and efficient facilities

• Communicate to stakeholders

• Run a bus

• Have a parents’ night

• Use social media

• Ensure students get first aid certificates and driver licences

• Show how equipment works

• Consider overseas students.

Some of this is complex, but most is simple to achieve.

Local Forester

Re: Urgent need for forestry graduates (June 13) and advice on graduate success.

On June 15 the EIT campus director stated they had produced two people to work in the industry in 2016. Turanga Ararau has been silent but I understand they produced 11 — from the same pool of potential workers.

Let’s show the public some real plans and actual results to meet the requirements of an industry that is set to require 40 percent more workers.

In your combined reply, you asked me to give positive ideas after I questioned why EIT made no mention of forestry results in a two-page spread that included Level 2 and 3 certificate students from automotive, agriculture, driving, winemaking, engineering and carpentry.

I am just a forester. If you want to know about cleaner water, less erosion, a greater range of life, safety, return on investment, jobs, the technical nature of our activities, plus a key response to global warming, see a forester.

While we wait for you to publish your own plans, here are some ideas, off the top of my head:

• Forget deficit theorising

• Aim to be the best in NZ

• Total accountability (this is how our businesses run)

• Manage performance

• See Ministry of Education and ITO Competenz for advice, nationwide contacts

• Benchmark and brainstorm with other forestry courses

• Survey your students and prospective students

• Have contractors interview prospective students

• Survey your customers

• Institute a real advisory committee with contractors and forest owners

• Eliminate drug use by students

• Plan, act, review

• Have plans B, C etc with Eastland Wood Council

• Hold forest visit trips (the last one was three years ago!) — not only for school children but anyone interested in work (including from outside the region)

• Use GoPros in training

• Set targets everywhere

• See other good youth trainers, eg rural fire, Waipaoa cadets

• Continuous improvement culture

• Change methods

• A support network for students in work

• Have existing workers on campus, contractors as tutors

• Have mentors, counsellors

• Exciting and efficient facilities

• Communicate to stakeholders

• Run a bus

• Have a parents’ night

• Use social media

• Ensure students get first aid certificates and driver licences

• Show how equipment works

• Consider overseas students.

Some of this is complex, but most is simple to achieve.

Local Forester

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Pull it in (your head) - 5 months ago
Dear Local Forester, Turanga Ararau are capable of speaking for themselves. Their silence suggests that either you are wrong or they are disinterested. Your abundance of bullet points "off the top of your head" merely prove to me that you are out of your head.

Henry Koia - 5 months ago
Be fair "Pull it in (your head)." Turanga Ararau's silence could also suggest that they have no insight to offer on why there is a critical shortage of forestry skills in our region and what is the solution. I am interested to know what Turanga Ararau's perspective is. Brainstorming to come up with a list of ideas spontaneously is widely used as a problem-solving technique. I think some of Local Forester's ideas are good ideas.

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