Greens strong as ever

LETTER

Your appraisal of the Green Party situation in Tuesday’s editorial is pretty fair, but like commentators up and down the country you need to guard against influencing an election through small inaccuracies.

The defection of two MPs has not “cast the party into disarray”. It has, however, cast the less responsible media into ecstasy. You say this will harm our election chances, but the truth is that it could, not that it will — unless, of course, people read doom into such a careless statement.

To say it has polarised the party is quite misleading. It’s easy to be polarised around a political situation and questions of strategy (which have been resolved), but we remain united in our values and vision. That’s real politics — policies.

Unfortunately, there are people, even quite intelligent ones, who hitch their vote to perceived winners, like betting on a sports game, instead of using it to support the best policies. This is a carry-over from first-past-the-post majority-government thinking, a sort of lemming lunacy, and leads to governments which do not represent our true values.

I write unofficially as a member, not a spokesperson, but can assert that far from being in disarray, the Green Party is as strong as ever, having dealt decisively with a problem, and is now struggling to redirect attention to things that matter. The campaigning activity of members, the number of new and youthful supporters, and the ability of the candidates are all at unprecedented levels.

The commitment to the member-led policy and the passion to save the environment and help the helpless is unchanged.

Gavin Maclean

Your appraisal of the Green Party situation in Tuesday’s editorial is pretty fair, but like commentators up and down the country you need to guard against influencing an election through small inaccuracies.

The defection of two MPs has not “cast the party into disarray”. It has, however, cast the less responsible media into ecstasy. You say this will harm our election chances, but the truth is that it could, not that it will — unless, of course, people read doom into such a careless statement.

To say it has polarised the party is quite misleading. It’s easy to be polarised around a political situation and questions of strategy (which have been resolved), but we remain united in our values and vision. That’s real politics — policies.

Unfortunately, there are people, even quite intelligent ones, who hitch their vote to perceived winners, like betting on a sports game, instead of using it to support the best policies. This is a carry-over from first-past-the-post majority-government thinking, a sort of lemming lunacy, and leads to governments which do not represent our true values.

I write unofficially as a member, not a spokesperson, but can assert that far from being in disarray, the Green Party is as strong as ever, having dealt decisively with a problem, and is now struggling to redirect attention to things that matter. The campaigning activity of members, the number of new and youthful supporters, and the ability of the candidates are all at unprecedented levels.

The commitment to the member-led policy and the passion to save the environment and help the helpless is unchanged.

Gavin Maclean

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Gordon Webb - 4 months ago
Clearly the recent Newshub poll doesn't show the Greens as strong as ever. While its supporters might rest on policies which (apparently) will save the environment and help the helpless, they have to convince the electorate that they are deserving of support. The trouble for the party is that voters tend to look at who is running the ship. In this case it's had a self-confessed law breaker leave its leadership (but still hanging around and showing no contrition) and the remaining leader would still back her. Presumably James Shaw must have known and supported his co-leader when she made her confession - a decision which was nothing less than political suicide. Politics 101 - never admit you are wrong. The party hierarchy misjudged completely how it would be received and made a very poor decision, which I am sure they now regret. Yet they are now asking voters to trust them to deliver on their policies. Labour must be wondering how it is going to deal with such a bunch of misfits if it stands by its Memorandum of Understanding.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you support the $6 million proposal for Rugby Park, which includes synthetic turf, an athletics track, additional sportsfield, all-weather sports pavilion and conference/function centre?