Leftish media bias troubling

Clive Bibby

COLUMN

There is nothing that threatens a marriage more these days than the introduction of an iPad or its equivalent to the matrimonial nest.

It doesn’t matter what good reason you have for using them, these machines are the modern killer of social conversation and ultimately the destroyer of harmonious relationships.

Used to excess, they become addictive and people stop talking to each other.

Most couples find they have to make choices about how often and how long they spend glued to this provider of all knowledge.

If we’re honest, the damned things aren’t always what they’re cracked up to be anyway, particularly if you are expecting the information you’re looking for to be presented in a form that makes the whole exercise enjoyable.

Take, for example, the items chosen by the sub-editors of our major news outlets to occupy the top half dozen spots of breaking news. When surfing the net on my iPad, trying to find a fair representation of the headlines, you can pretty much guarantee you will get a dramatically different interpretation of what actually happened or is happening depending on the TV channel or newspaper you subscribe to.

If you’re an Englishman wanting a conservative view of world events then buy the Telegraph and not the Guardian, which has a liberal bias.

Same thing when choosing TV channels out of the United States.

CNN has no trouble embellishing their coverage with comments that will make conservative viewers crawl up the wall, while Fox has the same effect on the “lefties”.

I don’t have a problem with that from the overseas outlets because, in the more densely-populated countries of the free world, you have multiple choices and can pick the one that tells it like you want to hear it.

In New Zealand, however, the differences between TV channels and print media are more subtle and often you are lured into reading or watching something in its entirety before you realise you have been duped.

The left-wing bias in this country so dominates the scene that finding an accommodation can be difficult.

A case in point:

Initially, the recent sensation surrounding the Green Party co-leader’s confession to ripping off the benefit system, plus admitting to committing electoral fraud, morphed into a one-sided presentation of the facts as a defence of her actions. Unbelievable!

Many commentators pushed the line that we should applaud her actions because not to do so was somehow evidence of being a racist, lacking in compassion or being incapable of appreciating just how bad the system really is.

Well, I’m none of those people and am happy with my opinion that her “crocodile tears” disclosure was a cynical, calculated attempt to revive a flagging campaign at the expense of anyone who was vulnerable to this classic “holier than thou” Greens approach.

Unfortunately for Ms Turei, she hadn’t reckoned on a desperate Labour Party who gambled on throwing its leader under the bus, or that there were members of her own party who had had enough.

Some media have found it hard to admit they backed the wrong horse, and exposed themselves in doing so.

Whatever, at last the Greens have emerged from the shadows and are finally seen as they really are. Hopefully, the voting public will judge them accordingly. The wraps are off and we can observe a corpse shrouded in naked self interest.

Should we have expected more? Probably not!

There is nothing that threatens a marriage more these days than the introduction of an iPad or its equivalent to the matrimonial nest.

It doesn’t matter what good reason you have for using them, these machines are the modern killer of social conversation and ultimately the destroyer of harmonious relationships.

Used to excess, they become addictive and people stop talking to each other.

Most couples find they have to make choices about how often and how long they spend glued to this provider of all knowledge.

If we’re honest, the damned things aren’t always what they’re cracked up to be anyway, particularly if you are expecting the information you’re looking for to be presented in a form that makes the whole exercise enjoyable.

Take, for example, the items chosen by the sub-editors of our major news outlets to occupy the top half dozen spots of breaking news. When surfing the net on my iPad, trying to find a fair representation of the headlines, you can pretty much guarantee you will get a dramatically different interpretation of what actually happened or is happening depending on the TV channel or newspaper you subscribe to.

If you’re an Englishman wanting a conservative view of world events then buy the Telegraph and not the Guardian, which has a liberal bias.

Same thing when choosing TV channels out of the United States.

CNN has no trouble embellishing their coverage with comments that will make conservative viewers crawl up the wall, while Fox has the same effect on the “lefties”.

I don’t have a problem with that from the overseas outlets because, in the more densely-populated countries of the free world, you have multiple choices and can pick the one that tells it like you want to hear it.

In New Zealand, however, the differences between TV channels and print media are more subtle and often you are lured into reading or watching something in its entirety before you realise you have been duped.

The left-wing bias in this country so dominates the scene that finding an accommodation can be difficult.

A case in point:

Initially, the recent sensation surrounding the Green Party co-leader’s confession to ripping off the benefit system, plus admitting to committing electoral fraud, morphed into a one-sided presentation of the facts as a defence of her actions. Unbelievable!

Many commentators pushed the line that we should applaud her actions because not to do so was somehow evidence of being a racist, lacking in compassion or being incapable of appreciating just how bad the system really is.

Well, I’m none of those people and am happy with my opinion that her “crocodile tears” disclosure was a cynical, calculated attempt to revive a flagging campaign at the expense of anyone who was vulnerable to this classic “holier than thou” Greens approach.

Unfortunately for Ms Turei, she hadn’t reckoned on a desperate Labour Party who gambled on throwing its leader under the bus, or that there were members of her own party who had had enough.

Some media have found it hard to admit they backed the wrong horse, and exposed themselves in doing so.

Whatever, at last the Greens have emerged from the shadows and are finally seen as they really are. Hopefully, the voting public will judge them accordingly. The wraps are off and we can observe a corpse shrouded in naked self interest.

Should we have expected more? Probably not!

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