‘Helen’ doco worth seeing

LETTER

I urge everyone to see the documentary My Year With Helen, now showing at the Odeon. It reveals the process of electing the Secretary General of the United Nations. The last eight Secretary Generals were elected secretly; at least this time there was a modicum of transparency.

The process was revealed as behind-the-scenes horse trading by the five permanent members of the Security Council; so not much has changed.

The ninth Secretary General is a male, selected by a group of 14 males; the one woman, the US representative, was absent for the final session.

What is clear is national interests and gender politics.

There were half a dozen well qualified women, among them Helen Clark, who held the third most senior post at the United Nations.

At least there is evidence that change is possible. Ms Clark’s gender did not prevent her from becoming prime minister, and Bill English was not hindered by his religion, which would have been the case not so long ago.

It was also instructive to see the way Helen Clark used social media, which will be crucial to engaging and involving young people in the political arena.

Kudos to the NZ Film Commission and other organisations which funded this documentary.

Hopeful Observer

I urge everyone to see the documentary My Year With Helen, now showing at the Odeon. It reveals the process of electing the Secretary General of the United Nations. The last eight Secretary Generals were elected secretly; at least this time there was a modicum of transparency.

The process was revealed as behind-the-scenes horse trading by the five permanent members of the Security Council; so not much has changed.

The ninth Secretary General is a male, selected by a group of 14 males; the one woman, the US representative, was absent for the final session.

What is clear is national interests and gender politics.

There were half a dozen well qualified women, among them Helen Clark, who held the third most senior post at the United Nations.

At least there is evidence that change is possible. Ms Clark’s gender did not prevent her from becoming prime minister, and Bill English was not hindered by his religion, which would have been the case not so long ago.

It was also instructive to see the way Helen Clark used social media, which will be crucial to engaging and involving young people in the political arena.

Kudos to the NZ Film Commission and other organisations which funded this documentary.

Hopeful Observer

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Identity Politics is divisive - 10 days ago
I'm sure your nom de plume should have been Hopeful Observeress.

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