Insatiable enthusiasm

LETTER

This region has just lost one of its most valuable sons.

I actually hardly knew Dean Witters, but followed his career with interest and admiration.

I also identified with his struggles against those who obstructed his progress, not because they disagreed with his ideas but because they couldn’t handle his drive to get things done.

It is perhaps an indictment of our honours system that Dean was overlooked for recognition during all those years he battled away trying to make this community a better place for us all.

Sadly, it is often the way that individuals of this quality don’t fit the criteria that would have enabled an acknowledgement at the highest level. Unfortunately for Dean, he was his own man and wasn’t afraid to go to places where others feared to tread. Of course, his type of person will accomplish things that others couldn’t, but it also meant he was prepared to take risks that stretched his financial and mental resources to breaking point.

It is hardest on those closest to people like Dean when the failures come home to roost. It hasn’t always been easy on his family. To some he was a maverick who should be avoided, but I can’t imagine that bothered him in the slightest.

Dean’s positive attributes have left us a legacy that will be hard to duplicate.

After suffering the consequences of a project that didn’t go so well, he would simply pick himself up and get involved with something else, often successfully.

His enthusiasm for life and passion for this region were insatiable. It took a cruel illness to finally silence him.

It is a tragedy that we have lost such a unique character at a time when we need people of that calibre more than ever.

Clive Bibby

This region has just lost one of its most valuable sons.

I actually hardly knew Dean Witters, but followed his career with interest and admiration.

I also identified with his struggles against those who obstructed his progress, not because they disagreed with his ideas but because they couldn’t handle his drive to get things done.

It is perhaps an indictment of our honours system that Dean was overlooked for recognition during all those years he battled away trying to make this community a better place for us all.

Sadly, it is often the way that individuals of this quality don’t fit the criteria that would have enabled an acknowledgement at the highest level. Unfortunately for Dean, he was his own man and wasn’t afraid to go to places where others feared to tread. Of course, his type of person will accomplish things that others couldn’t, but it also meant he was prepared to take risks that stretched his financial and mental resources to breaking point.

It is hardest on those closest to people like Dean when the failures come home to roost. It hasn’t always been easy on his family. To some he was a maverick who should be avoided, but I can’t imagine that bothered him in the slightest.

Dean’s positive attributes have left us a legacy that will be hard to duplicate.

After suffering the consequences of a project that didn’t go so well, he would simply pick himself up and get involved with something else, often successfully.

His enthusiasm for life and passion for this region were insatiable. It took a cruel illness to finally silence him.

It is a tragedy that we have lost such a unique character at a time when we need people of that calibre more than ever.

Clive Bibby

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