Police explain

LETTER

I saw a colourful car going down the road the other day with Pirihimana sign-written on the front doors. I think it must be a new fast food chain delivery vehicle; never heard of it before.

Ray Hill

I saw a colourful car going down the road the other day with Pirihimana sign-written on the front doors. I think it must be a new fast food chain delivery vehicle; never heard of it before.

Ray Hill

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Manu Caddie - 5 days ago
You must have had a very sheltered existence growing up in a mono-cultural community. Welcome to a whole new way of seeing the world where Pakeha culture isn't always the dominant paradigm.

Paul Sullivan - 5 days ago
Give them a ring and ask for a pizza Ray, see how you get on. I've only been here four years and I've heard of it plenty, so you must have led a very sheltered life indeed - particularly in a region with such a high Maori population. I can only suggest you either get out more or pay a visit to Specsavers.

lloyd gretton - 5 days ago
The Irish Republic paint Guardia over all their police cars. But everyone calls them cops or peelers. Pirihimana is just a Maorification of police. I find it significant or amusing there is no indigenous Maori word for police.

Lara Meyer - 5 days ago
Ka pai a Manu me Paora

Paul Sullivan - 4 days ago
Lloyd, the word you're looking for is "Garda", used because it is of the indigenous language (much like Pirihimana). Never heard them called 'peelers' in Ireland though, more usually 'guards' or the universal 'cops'

lloyd gretton - 4 days ago
I did some google translation. The Irish Republic's word for police is gardia according to google. Children think the word is guards. Not so wrong. It comes from the Gaelic Irish language which is a relation of English. The Maori word for guards is kaitiaki. A much better and real indigenous word for police, I think. Peeler was the name for police during and after British rule. In China where I live, the national language Mandarin is in decline as the younger generations push for English. There is a revival of dialects because of population mobility.

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