Change is essential

LETTER

It’s time people who used to vote National out of habit or trust checked what they are on about. As voting proceeds, it’s interesting to look at last week’s news under their tender “care”.

An increase to elective surgery — while denying that health is underfunded. Claims that health funding has increased every year —without admitting that the increases were always less than inflation plus population growth. A promise slowly to help one sixth of children out of poverty — having denied the poverty problem they created. At the same time, a crackdown on human rights, in defiance of all good advice and ethical principle; and a crackdown on beneficiaries — how that will fix poverty is beyond me.

A partial concession towards a child-abuse inquiry, having claimed there was no need. Continuing refusal of a mental-health inquiry. CAB reports 12,000 complaints in a year over employment agreements. Tenants who house the homeless get evicted. Bill English still manages, in te reo week, to talk about “Wonga-newey” and “Terranecki” — yet people think he’s clever. Most of us can manage five vowels.

It’s easy to pick the shallow policies — the election-year stuff — from the deep ideology, that increasing their favourite polluting businesses and rewarding the rich will somehow help the nation as a whole. (The world as a whole they can’t begin to think about.) It’s easy to spot the hypocrisy; harder to know why many really good people have supported something that is undeniably evil. I think — and global research on conservatism affirms —that the explanation is a combination of habit and trust. Shame!

It’s vital to bring about a change. Labour and Greens will tax a little more to make dramatic changes to the general welfare, and start reversing the ruin of air, land and water. The difference between them is that the Green policy is deeper, stronger and more unified, and will help Labour stick to the good things they have recently promised. A party vote for Green is the best thing you can do for them both — and your tamariki.

Gavin Maclean

It’s time people who used to vote National out of habit or trust checked what they are on about. As voting proceeds, it’s interesting to look at last week’s news under their tender “care”.

An increase to elective surgery — while denying that health is underfunded. Claims that health funding has increased every year —without admitting that the increases were always less than inflation plus population growth. A promise slowly to help one sixth of children out of poverty — having denied the poverty problem they created. At the same time, a crackdown on human rights, in defiance of all good advice and ethical principle; and a crackdown on beneficiaries — how that will fix poverty is beyond me.

A partial concession towards a child-abuse inquiry, having claimed there was no need. Continuing refusal of a mental-health inquiry. CAB reports 12,000 complaints in a year over employment agreements. Tenants who house the homeless get evicted. Bill English still manages, in te reo week, to talk about “Wonga-newey” and “Terranecki” — yet people think he’s clever. Most of us can manage five vowels.

It’s easy to pick the shallow policies — the election-year stuff — from the deep ideology, that increasing their favourite polluting businesses and rewarding the rich will somehow help the nation as a whole. (The world as a whole they can’t begin to think about.) It’s easy to spot the hypocrisy; harder to know why many really good people have supported something that is undeniably evil. I think — and global research on conservatism affirms —that the explanation is a combination of habit and trust. Shame!

It’s vital to bring about a change. Labour and Greens will tax a little more to make dramatic changes to the general welfare, and start reversing the ruin of air, land and water. The difference between them is that the Green policy is deeper, stronger and more unified, and will help Labour stick to the good things they have recently promised. A party vote for Green is the best thing you can do for them both — and your tamariki.

Gavin Maclean

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Gordon Webb - 5 days ago
The problem with a Green tick is that its leader backed a self-confessed fraudster to the hilt. That alone gives him zero moral mandate to be anywhere near the corridors of power.

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