Not put out by expletive

LETTER

These days I have learned to detune my writing to the degree that it bears more resemblance to a bowl of blancmange than the truth.

I for one was not the least put-out therefore by Manu Caddie’s much-maligned expletive. I was more upset by the “slam-dunkedness” of his letter. I am all about “The One Great Scorer” and would have far preferred it if he had explained his assertion so that Mike Mulrooney had something to work with in terms of “continuing” the dialogue.

More than anything Mike and Manu said, however, the thought that really struck me hard was, “Jeremy Muir . . . you printed that!? That’s showing class.”

A long time ago I had asked him to lay down his editor’s knife and give us writers our heads. This was on the strength of a conversation with someone who told me about a police statement he made. When the officer read it back to him with all its references to “this bloke and that one”, he realised “that is me talking”.

I wanted to see the raw edges of who we are in our letters, and Jeremy had certainly delivered.

Then last week when I read about the courtroom outburst and the young “self-appointed jury foreman” telling his “colleagues” they had “bleeped up” I was aghast. More raps Jeremy . . . the actual words he used spoke to me more than any “invalid food” which I would have served up.

Although I may find it hugely refreshing to see the “language of the streets” appearing in our newspaper, I have precisely no interest in all those low-tone, one-upping internet exchanges for the fact that no one is “building” anything.

In stepping up to the plate as “moderator”, however, I commend The Herald for the way it has used its power to stop (slow) the “big person’s” world and advance the inconvenient truth which is the “little people”. (Luke 10:21 allusion for anyone interested.)

Mark Bird

These days I have learned to detune my writing to the degree that it bears more resemblance to a bowl of blancmange than the truth.

I for one was not the least put-out therefore by Manu Caddie’s much-maligned expletive. I was more upset by the “slam-dunkedness” of his letter. I am all about “The One Great Scorer” and would have far preferred it if he had explained his assertion so that Mike Mulrooney had something to work with in terms of “continuing” the dialogue.

More than anything Mike and Manu said, however, the thought that really struck me hard was, “Jeremy Muir . . . you printed that!? That’s showing class.”

A long time ago I had asked him to lay down his editor’s knife and give us writers our heads. This was on the strength of a conversation with someone who told me about a police statement he made. When the officer read it back to him with all its references to “this bloke and that one”, he realised “that is me talking”.

I wanted to see the raw edges of who we are in our letters, and Jeremy had certainly delivered.

Then last week when I read about the courtroom outburst and the young “self-appointed jury foreman” telling his “colleagues” they had “bleeped up” I was aghast. More raps Jeremy . . . the actual words he used spoke to me more than any “invalid food” which I would have served up.

Although I may find it hugely refreshing to see the “language of the streets” appearing in our newspaper, I have precisely no interest in all those low-tone, one-upping internet exchanges for the fact that no one is “building” anything.

In stepping up to the plate as “moderator”, however, I commend The Herald for the way it has used its power to stop (slow) the “big person’s” world and advance the inconvenient truth which is the “little people”. (Luke 10:21 allusion for anyone interested.)

Mark Bird

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Donald Robson - 22 days ago
Well said Mark. Unvarnished, honest opinion tells us more about the writers of letters than the edited versions, and often in ways they haven't imagined.

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