Protecting the bailiwick

LETTER

Councillor Thomson, speaking in his letter to the editor of October 20, 2017, said: “. . . we find ourselves, with a whole range of other major costs in the near future”.

I find him an open-minded councillor and one who represents his bailiwick well. In his view, “. . . it is simplistic to reject questions of cost on the basis the proposal is intended to use only grant funding, because the principle source of that funding is public money. Our requests for public funding should be prioritised according to the greater need.”

He then gives us this, “As an example, the Waipaoa flood control scheme will cost in excess of $10 million and that fits comfortably within the funding principles of Eastland Community Trust, by promoting and sustaining economic development.”

The scheme protects our fertile flood plain land from Te Karaka out to the river mouth.

As a ratepayer I certainly support the objective, and if ECT funds this project it will help our Mayor (an ECT trustee) to meet his election promise not to increase rates above 2 percent.

The problem for me is where is the benefit for those thousands of renters, far from that river, who have been paying into that ECT fund with their electricity bills (highest in New Zealand) for more than 20 years?

Winston Moreton

Councillor Thomson, speaking in his letter to the editor of October 20, 2017, said: “. . . we find ourselves, with a whole range of other major costs in the near future”.

I find him an open-minded councillor and one who represents his bailiwick well. In his view, “. . . it is simplistic to reject questions of cost on the basis the proposal is intended to use only grant funding, because the principle source of that funding is public money. Our requests for public funding should be prioritised according to the greater need.”

He then gives us this, “As an example, the Waipaoa flood control scheme will cost in excess of $10 million and that fits comfortably within the funding principles of Eastland Community Trust, by promoting and sustaining economic development.”

The scheme protects our fertile flood plain land from Te Karaka out to the river mouth.

As a ratepayer I certainly support the objective, and if ECT funds this project it will help our Mayor (an ECT trustee) to meet his election promise not to increase rates above 2 percent.

The problem for me is where is the benefit for those thousands of renters, far from that river, who have been paying into that ECT fund with their electricity bills (highest in New Zealand) for more than 20 years?

Winston Moreton

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Ray Hill - 23 days ago
Mayor Meng Foon has had nearly five terms to deal with the rates. Instead, when elected he promised to keep a low rate take ? how dopey is that?
I asked him the same week that the Labour Party chose a new leader why he did not also fall on the sword.
I have said in a previous letter to the editor that you people who want all the goodies that go with a nice city will have to pay.
The Deputy Mayor is a lovely person and needs to take the reins. The mare we have is getting lame and ready for the glue factory . . .

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