Neglected state of the i-Site garden a shock

LETTER

I recently had cause to visit the local information centre/ bus station. I was shocked by the state of the garden which contains flowering puha and dead lancewoods. There is a shabby, weathered seat which appears quite distressed along with the equally-distressed totem pole, a parking sign which is on a magnificent lean and damaged frontage at ground level.

I was informed that the garden and the building are the responsibilty of Activate Tairawhiti. I visited the website of Activate Tairawhiti to discover a colourful, eye catching affair that bears no connection to what is not happening in this town. It should be named Deactivate Tairawhiti.

When one visits an information centre it should be a visually pleasant experience, especially for tourists passing through. Think of Rotorua and Napier.

Summer is fast approaching. Maintenance is the key word. I am curious to know how Activate Tairawhiti is funded, what they have done in practical terms for Gisborne this year and what their expenditure is.

The Gisborne Herald should provide a colour photograph to show the current state of the garden.

R.A. Bonner

Footnote response from Activate Tairawhiti chief executive Steve Breen: Thank you to R.A. Bonner for their enquiry. We acknowledge the importance of presenting a suitable welcome to visitors to the i-Site and as tenants of the i-Site building, we’ve taken responsibility for maintaining the gardens while we work with those other parties also responsible for the site’s presentation.

I recently had cause to visit the local information centre/ bus station. I was shocked by the state of the garden which contains flowering puha and dead lancewoods. There is a shabby, weathered seat which appears quite distressed along with the equally-distressed totem pole, a parking sign which is on a magnificent lean and damaged frontage at ground level.

I was informed that the garden and the building are the responsibilty of Activate Tairawhiti. I visited the website of Activate Tairawhiti to discover a colourful, eye catching affair that bears no connection to what is not happening in this town. It should be named Deactivate Tairawhiti.

When one visits an information centre it should be a visually pleasant experience, especially for tourists passing through. Think of Rotorua and Napier.

Summer is fast approaching. Maintenance is the key word. I am curious to know how Activate Tairawhiti is funded, what they have done in practical terms for Gisborne this year and what their expenditure is.

The Gisborne Herald should provide a colour photograph to show the current state of the garden.

R.A. Bonner

Footnote response from Activate Tairawhiti chief executive Steve Breen: Thank you to R.A. Bonner for their enquiry. We acknowledge the importance of presenting a suitable welcome to visitors to the i-Site and as tenants of the i-Site building, we’ve taken responsibility for maintaining the gardens while we work with those other parties also responsible for the site’s presentation.

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