Forget the ‘Old’, God is love

LETTER

Re: Intelligent creator versus evolution, November 11.

Martin Hanson’s honest delving into the Old Testament scriptures that paint God as unforgiving and vengeful drew a strong response from two anti-science creationists. They were from opposite sides of the United States, the only country not signed up to the Paris climate accord.

There is no need for any open-minded Christians to be offended. Apart from Martin’s mention of the blessed visit from two Jehovah’s Witnesses, his whole piece pertained to the old Testament texts and values etc.

The mainstream Churches I attend nowadays go lightly on that Old Testament vengeance and punishment stuff. They share the New Testament messages of Jesus’ day and of the loving and forgiving God.

The scientific findings of recent centuries — Big Bang, evolution and climate change — are readily accepted.

I share a snippet from Monsignor Frank’s message in the November 11-12 Gisborne St Mary’s Star of the Sea information sheet:

“In the coming week let us remember the Climate Change Conference in Germany, and pray for a good outcome to ensure a good quality of life for children and their children and for generations to come.”

In my “Indeed a useful guide to life” column on the same page of Saturday’s paper I wrote of the 500 years of ongoing reformation.

Indeed, here I see a growing openness, honesty and sharing between churches and faiths, and have high hope this will keep on spreading.

Forget that Old Testament stuff. God is love.

Bob Hughes

Re: Intelligent creator versus evolution, November 11.

Martin Hanson’s honest delving into the Old Testament scriptures that paint God as unforgiving and vengeful drew a strong response from two anti-science creationists. They were from opposite sides of the United States, the only country not signed up to the Paris climate accord.

There is no need for any open-minded Christians to be offended. Apart from Martin’s mention of the blessed visit from two Jehovah’s Witnesses, his whole piece pertained to the old Testament texts and values etc.

The mainstream Churches I attend nowadays go lightly on that Old Testament vengeance and punishment stuff. They share the New Testament messages of Jesus’ day and of the loving and forgiving God.

The scientific findings of recent centuries — Big Bang, evolution and climate change — are readily accepted.

I share a snippet from Monsignor Frank’s message in the November 11-12 Gisborne St Mary’s Star of the Sea information sheet:

“In the coming week let us remember the Climate Change Conference in Germany, and pray for a good outcome to ensure a good quality of life for children and their children and for generations to come.”

In my “Indeed a useful guide to life” column on the same page of Saturday’s paper I wrote of the 500 years of ongoing reformation.

Indeed, here I see a growing openness, honesty and sharing between churches and faiths, and have high hope this will keep on spreading.

Forget that Old Testament stuff. God is love.

Bob Hughes

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Tony Lee - 6 days ago
As human knowledge and understanding of the physical world has developed, the need for mystical explanations has diminished. Zeus, Apollo, the god of the Old Testament have only historical significance. And so it will go on with more modern incarnations, with theism gradually being replaced by rationalism.

Bob Hughes - 5 days ago
I disagree with Tony. Religion is not just about mystical explanations; nor that "human knowledge and understanding of the physical world has developed". Certainly not near enough to bring rationality in solving our world's present dire problems.
I know some within religion do dismiss human responsibility because of the second coming. Or God himself will right all the wayward damage we have inflicted on His planet.
There is indeed a growing awareness of responsibility for the planet and people spreading amongst the faiths of the world.
So let's not drop religion from our hopes for the future of our planet and peoples.

Tony Lee - 5 days ago
C'mon Bob, the basis of all religion is the belief in a god of one sort or another. Without that, religion serves no purpose that could be found elsewhere. Religion creates problems through zealotry, intolerance and the certainty of rightness. With hope for the future, individuals will discover they have no need of their invention and consign theism to a historical curiosity.
I wonder why some think that a god is needed to provide moral codes of behaviour?

Bob Hughes - 5 days ago
As Tony says maybe a God should not be needed "to provide (that) moral code of behaviours".
I'm sure if Tony searched all that human knowledge and understanding he mentioned earlier, he would discover those "problems through zealotry, intolerance and certainty of rightness" are not religious but human traits. I repeat, I see a growing openness, honesty and sharing between churches and faiths, and have high hope this will keep on spreading.
I now add, I sincerely hope this trend fast catches on with all the non-religious sections of the world's communities.

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