A problem with questions?

LETTER

I’d like to reply to Stewart Patrick’s article in Christian Comment (November 18).

I quote “Unbelievers have a habit of asking questions to take the spotlight off of their ignorance and pride.” And “The most ignorant person in the world can ask a question, but the person who knows doesn’t need to ask.”

What? If we didn’t ask questions we would never learn anything!

John 14:12: Jesus said “I say unto you, he that believes on me, the works that I do shall he do also; and greater works than these shall he do.”

So why aren’t Christians today healing the sick?

I will continue to seek knowledge and ask questions until I can demonstrate the healing power of the Truth. Only then will I know that I know the Truth.

Raising the dead and walking on water may take a little longer. I know, I know, I’m weird. Earth calling Heather ...

Heather van Wyk

I’d like to reply to Stewart Patrick’s article in Christian Comment (November 18).

I quote “Unbelievers have a habit of asking questions to take the spotlight off of their ignorance and pride.” And “The most ignorant person in the world can ask a question, but the person who knows doesn’t need to ask.”

What? If we didn’t ask questions we would never learn anything!

John 14:12: Jesus said “I say unto you, he that believes on me, the works that I do shall he do also; and greater works than these shall he do.”

So why aren’t Christians today healing the sick?

I will continue to seek knowledge and ask questions until I can demonstrate the healing power of the Truth. Only then will I know that I know the Truth.

Raising the dead and walking on water may take a little longer. I know, I know, I’m weird. Earth calling Heather ...

Heather van Wyk

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Bob Hughes - 23 days ago
Right on Heather, ask and you will be given, seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened, and faith without works is dead.

Who knows . . . - 22 days ago
Maybe it's all a con? Anyway, any "problems with questions" pale into insignificance compared to the massive problem of lack of tangible results in regards to healing of illness. Why don't the Christian prayers clear the hospitals of patients? Should be easy-peasy. Hmmm . . . to any rational mind, things just don't seem to add up correctly . . . No Siree . . . Surely the average Joe Bloggs could be forgiven for steering well clear of it all, and even suspecting it may all be at its essence nothing but a wishful-thinking belief system or, dare I say it, baloney.

Tony - 22 days ago
Baloney says who knows? Yes, but, don't give the non-Christians a free ride - all this faith healing nonsense is exactly that.

Martin Hanson - 21 days ago
If faith is a ticket to the "Pearly Gates", but is not "self-generated", one is entitled to wonder what criteria the deity use in bestowing it. Sounds very much like discrimination to me.

Bob Hughes - 21 days ago
You are all a little bit right, OK then, forget the faith. But for Christ's sake, let's all get to it and act for the benefit of our mother Earth and keep her habitable.

Wayne Elmsly - 21 days ago
I am a bit reluctant to comment on this, but I think there are several issues here which are being confused.
1. There is the overall matter of the Christian faith, not just about a single aspect like faith healing or the Ten Commandments.
2. Faith healing may occur, but it is not a common occurrence. I haven't encountered it personally. However, it may exist. People claim it is real.
3 Most of the Bible consists of the Hebrew Scriptures, also called the Old Testament. There is a lot of material that is very rarely read and there are stories and material including commandments other than the Big Ten that will never be talked about in a Sunday Service. I won't mention them, because they are not likely to be published in this paper.
4 I think perhaps the only way to address these issues is to do a long theology course. Most people don't want to do that.
5 Of course, people can believe what they want to believe. However, looking at the large number of denominations there is a large amount of disagreement. Not all Christians agree on everything.
6 I believe in the Christian faith, but I am reluctant to decide on doctrinal issues, and I don't try to get people to believe certain matters. There will always be diversity.
7 I am not sure what this correspondence is actually about. It seems very confused to me.

Baz Davies. - 20 days ago
It wasn't that long ago in our history that if you questioned the existence of God you were labelled a heretic and could be burned at the stake.
Investigating science or chemistry was deemed to be witchcraft. In fact, asking questions about anything that was in direct conflict with the teachings contained in the bible was a dangerous practice.
Controlling the population through ignorance was a powerful tool for religious leaders.
Fortunately, plenty of brave individuals, asking questions, has led us out of the dark ages and into a new awareness of science, our natural world, and the meaning of life. The world is a better place because of questions and the search for knowledge.

Wayne Elmsly - 18 days ago
William Tyndale was burned at the stake for translating the Bible into English.

Studying the physical world was not always considered to be witchcraft.

The problem with questioning the teachings in the Bible has always been the matter of their interpretation. Throughout history Christians just did not agree. Whatever you believed, there would be people who disagreed, and things sometimes became messy!

Paul, in his letters, continually asks for agreement. It hasn't quite happened.

I think it is not quite right to say that religious leaders controlled the population through ignorance. This is a very general statement, and I think there are some specific examples where this may have happened, but there are also many examples where it didn't happen. I am not sure who is supposed to be ignorant? The religious leaders, or the population? Or both?

I would question the idea that the world has become a better place. We know a lot now. We can potentially stop famine, epidemics, warfare, global warming and a nuclear disaster, but are we doing this? We haven't really sorted this out yet!

I went back to Stewart Patrick's original comment on the Ten Commandments.

I agree with what he says in a general sense. The Ten Commandments are good stuff! However, I think it is likely that there will always be diversity in how people react to this sort of religious doctrine.