Perhaps better to ‘live and let live’

LETTER

While I have no particular axe to grind, I feel Esther Henderson’s column in Saturday night’s paper has a few inaccuracies.

First, she does not want to play biblical ping pong with Martin Hansen and then proceeds to do just that. He is accused of unrepresentative, biased quotes which are “out of context”. By implication, can one assume her quotes are not?

She further names a number of famous people, who significantly come from the Western tradition, as a sort of proof that since they followed the Christian belief system, say no more. I don’t think I would necessarily seek out Samuel Morse or Thomas Edison as my spiritual adviser, if that were possible. It is also instructive to Google Sir Isaac Newton and Arian.

My experience of life is that everyone has “feet of clay” and one does not have to do much biographical reading to find that fame and success in one particular area of expertise does not necessarily mean that “rubs off” in other areas. For example, one might be a brilliant nuclear physicist, but just “Joe Ordinary” as a philosopher or religious interpreter.

I would also suggest that if one examines the undoubtedly gifted and famous in such current and historical populations as the Chinese, Indian and Arab worlds, their religious and moral beliefs would probably follow that of the society or civilisation they were raised in.

I really don’t think you can debate the supernatural, as you can’t “prove” your position right and, just as equally, you can’t “prove” the opposite position wrong.

I am fascinated by the phrase “genuine enquirers”, as I wonder who sets the bar for genuine? Perhaps it would be better to “live and let live” really?

Ron Taylor

While I have no particular axe to grind, I feel Esther Henderson’s column in Saturday night’s paper has a few inaccuracies.

First, she does not want to play biblical ping pong with Martin Hansen and then proceeds to do just that. He is accused of unrepresentative, biased quotes which are “out of context”. By implication, can one assume her quotes are not?

She further names a number of famous people, who significantly come from the Western tradition, as a sort of proof that since they followed the Christian belief system, say no more. I don’t think I would necessarily seek out Samuel Morse or Thomas Edison as my spiritual adviser, if that were possible. It is also instructive to Google Sir Isaac Newton and Arian.

My experience of life is that everyone has “feet of clay” and one does not have to do much biographical reading to find that fame and success in one particular area of expertise does not necessarily mean that “rubs off” in other areas. For example, one might be a brilliant nuclear physicist, but just “Joe Ordinary” as a philosopher or religious interpreter.

I would also suggest that if one examines the undoubtedly gifted and famous in such current and historical populations as the Chinese, Indian and Arab worlds, their religious and moral beliefs would probably follow that of the society or civilisation they were raised in.

I really don’t think you can debate the supernatural, as you can’t “prove” your position right and, just as equally, you can’t “prove” the opposite position wrong.

I am fascinated by the phrase “genuine enquirers”, as I wonder who sets the bar for genuine? Perhaps it would be better to “live and let live” really?

Ron Taylor

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    Do you agree with the Government’s new guideline for police, to not prosecute drug users when a therapeutic approach would be more beneficial or there is no public interest in prosecution?