Captain Cook much respected, ‘astronaut of his time’

LETTER

I note Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced on Friday $1 million for a programme to commemorate the first encounters between Maori and Europeans. Later in his address (as reported) he referred to Tuia Encounters 250. Does this replace Te Ha?

I also am curious to know if a small part of this money would be available to refurbish and reinstall the Endeavour models, which appear to be stalled for financial reasons.

Captain Cook carries much respect, particularly among people of European heritage.

I applaud the recognition of the skills of the great Polynesian navigators, but still marvel at the feats of such navigators as James Cook, George Vancouver, William Bligh and New Zealand’s own Frank Worsley (born Akaroa), who was Shackleton’s captain.

On the plinth of the Cook Statue at The Cut are etched lines showing the extent of Cook’s voyages. All that without the benefit of back-up, in mostly uncharted waters and with only the wind for useful propulsion. I think of him as an astronaut of his time.

Ron Taylor


Footnote from Ed: The national commemoration is named Tuia — Encounters 250; the Tairawhiti commemorations are called Te Ha.

I note Regional Economic Development Minister Shane Jones announced on Friday $1 million for a programme to commemorate the first encounters between Maori and Europeans. Later in his address (as reported) he referred to Tuia Encounters 250. Does this replace Te Ha?

I also am curious to know if a small part of this money would be available to refurbish and reinstall the Endeavour models, which appear to be stalled for financial reasons.

Captain Cook carries much respect, particularly among people of European heritage.

I applaud the recognition of the skills of the great Polynesian navigators, but still marvel at the feats of such navigators as James Cook, George Vancouver, William Bligh and New Zealand’s own Frank Worsley (born Akaroa), who was Shackleton’s captain.

On the plinth of the Cook Statue at The Cut are etched lines showing the extent of Cook’s voyages. All that without the benefit of back-up, in mostly uncharted waters and with only the wind for useful propulsion. I think of him as an astronaut of his time.

Ron Taylor


Footnote from Ed: The national commemoration is named Tuia — Encounters 250; the Tairawhiti commemorations are called Te Ha.

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