‘No confidence’ vote?

LETTER

I hope all councillors in favour of the “name change” read The Gisborne Herald on Saturday. Your 13-1 vote for change absolutely staggered me and, I would suggest, half of our population at least.

The webpoll showed 71 percent against officially recognising Tairawhiti as a name for the district and only a meagre 27 percent for.

Perhaps it’s time our council recognised what the people want, not what our Mayor desires. Councillors are voted in to “hopefully” follow the wishes of the electors, not the hierarchy. All I can say to those occupying chairs in the chambers of the “ethnically designed” council building is, “change our names at your peril”. I would suggest (with one exception) that you hold on to your day jobs.

Perhaps avenues required for a “vote of no confidence” need to be quickly examined.

Pam Kay, Mary Parker, Karen Jackson, L Francis and Doreen, thanks for having the courage to put pen to paper and, also, being brave enough to sign your names rather than hide behind a nom de plume. Kevin Kennedy; I, like you was proud to represent Poverty Bay in my chosen sport.

Can we count on others to write showing their support to this increasing “groundswell”?

If the New Zealand Geographic Board gives in to the advances of Gisborne District Council and sanctions the change of name for our bay, what will they do when Maori approach them saying they want a change to the original Maori name for Hawke’s Bay, Bay of Plenty etc etc etc?

If they give in to one, they are setting themselves up for a barrage of claims.

How on earth can 13-14 percent of New Zealand’s population receive, literally, everything they ask for?

Eamon, re your letter of March 7. Thank you so much for your succinct description of the problem we are faced with.

I enjoyed the description “cultural thievery”. How right you are!

MIKE MULROONEY

I hope all councillors in favour of the “name change” read The Gisborne Herald on Saturday. Your 13-1 vote for change absolutely staggered me and, I would suggest, half of our population at least.

The webpoll showed 71 percent against officially recognising Tairawhiti as a name for the district and only a meagre 27 percent for.

Perhaps it’s time our council recognised what the people want, not what our Mayor desires. Councillors are voted in to “hopefully” follow the wishes of the electors, not the hierarchy. All I can say to those occupying chairs in the chambers of the “ethnically designed” council building is, “change our names at your peril”. I would suggest (with one exception) that you hold on to your day jobs.

Perhaps avenues required for a “vote of no confidence” need to be quickly examined.

Pam Kay, Mary Parker, Karen Jackson, L Francis and Doreen, thanks for having the courage to put pen to paper and, also, being brave enough to sign your names rather than hide behind a nom de plume. Kevin Kennedy; I, like you was proud to represent Poverty Bay in my chosen sport.

Can we count on others to write showing their support to this increasing “groundswell”?

If the New Zealand Geographic Board gives in to the advances of Gisborne District Council and sanctions the change of name for our bay, what will they do when Maori approach them saying they want a change to the original Maori name for Hawke’s Bay, Bay of Plenty etc etc etc?

If they give in to one, they are setting themselves up for a barrage of claims.

How on earth can 13-14 percent of New Zealand’s population receive, literally, everything they ask for?

Eamon, re your letter of March 7. Thank you so much for your succinct description of the problem we are faced with.

I enjoyed the description “cultural thievery”. How right you are!

MIKE MULROONEY

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Michael Sunderland, Brisbane - 6 months ago
Mike,
May your pen run out of ink.

Ian Gilchrist - 6 months ago
AN ABUSE OF POSITION.
There seems to be a huge disparity between the roles of the council and their actual actions. Overall, in my years of being a rate payer I would have to say this current council has fielded the most flack and backlash I have ever seen. Clearly a huge percentage of people in our community are extremely unhappy with many of the council's decisions e.g. name changes. What has happened to our democratic society? This seems to be a process that has been disregarded by our council and replaced by a dictatorship. My father and grandfathers went to war to save our country from such fascism.

I posted this a couple of days ago in support of Mike's letters but it did not make the paper:

It appears that the representatives of our local council have forgotten the essence and responsibility that is bestowed upon them, and could be considered to be an act of treason against the people who voted them in. They are taking liberties that are not theirs to enact and have done so underhandedly. Such deceit only fuels resentment and incites segregation within a city that should be united and progressing forward as one.

The role of a council is as follows:
Local government basics
The Local Government Act 2002 states that the purpose of local government is:

To enable democratic local decision-making and action by, and on behalf of, communities; and

To meet the current and future needs of communities for good-quality local infrastructure, local public services, and performance of regulatory functions in a way that is most cost-effective for households and businesses.

Council activities
Regional councils are primarily concerned with environmental resource management, flood control, air and water quality, pest control, and, in specific cases, public transport, regional parks and bulk water supply.

Territorial authorities are responsible for a wide range of local services including roads, water reticulation, sewerage and refuse collection, libraries, parks, recreation services, local regulations, community and economic development, and town planning.

Councils, however, can differ widely in relation to activities they undertake, as long as they have consulted their communities in making the decisions. As a result, there is considerable diversity in the range of activities that councils provide, reflecting the different circumstances that cities, towns and communities find themselves in.

Participating in local government
One of the strengths of local government is the opportunity it allows for citizens to be directly engaged in the process of governing their own towns, cities and regions. The practice of self government enhances our understanding of citizenship while ensuring public services are responsive to the needs of the communities they are designed to serve.

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