‘Hard-done-by excuse’ carries no sway for many

LETTER

Re: Your March 8 editorial.

You mention poverty, violence, addiction, crime and incarceration that affects too many Maori. It is so easy to use the past to explain the present and question the future. There is only one reason so many Maori are incarcerated and that is they commit the most crime. Just read the court news printed in your paper. Check out the number of Maori and non-Maori and see for yourself.

This long-held “escape clause” so many offenders and defenders use to justify why they offend, deny, abuse and complain has nothing to do with what happened 100-200 years ago. We have all had problems in the past, but if we have any substance, we get over them by solving our problems, change our lifestyle and endeavour to exist happily in the environment we have.

Nobody forces them to misbehave.

The fact that land was confiscated is indisputable but that should not affect the Maori of today. Time has moved on, opportunities have arisen and life is so much better for all. I have countless Maori friends who have achieved far more than I and have simply “got on with life”. Maori have as much opportunity, if not more than non-Maori to make something of themselves. This excuse of “hard-done-by” carries no sway with so many.

Instead of always referring to what Maori lost (countless years ago), let us concentrate on what they can have and achieve if they are prepared to work towards their own future.

You state that Maori should have a greater say in decision making. They are already the only ethnic group specifically involved in council matters. Any approaches from non-Maori seem to be ignored. Please tell me where the fairness and balance begins, because countless members of our populace are simply left wondering.

Mike Mulrooney

Re: Your March 8 editorial.

You mention poverty, violence, addiction, crime and incarceration that affects too many Maori. It is so easy to use the past to explain the present and question the future. There is only one reason so many Maori are incarcerated and that is they commit the most crime. Just read the court news printed in your paper. Check out the number of Maori and non-Maori and see for yourself.

This long-held “escape clause” so many offenders and defenders use to justify why they offend, deny, abuse and complain has nothing to do with what happened 100-200 years ago. We have all had problems in the past, but if we have any substance, we get over them by solving our problems, change our lifestyle and endeavour to exist happily in the environment we have.

Nobody forces them to misbehave.

The fact that land was confiscated is indisputable but that should not affect the Maori of today. Time has moved on, opportunities have arisen and life is so much better for all. I have countless Maori friends who have achieved far more than I and have simply “got on with life”. Maori have as much opportunity, if not more than non-Maori to make something of themselves. This excuse of “hard-done-by” carries no sway with so many.

Instead of always referring to what Maori lost (countless years ago), let us concentrate on what they can have and achieve if they are prepared to work towards their own future.

You state that Maori should have a greater say in decision making. They are already the only ethnic group specifically involved in council matters. Any approaches from non-Maori seem to be ignored. Please tell me where the fairness and balance begins, because countless members of our populace are simply left wondering.

Mike Mulrooney

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Tony Lee - 8 months ago
Mike, should I ignore and hope your ideas fade into oblivion or something else? I should probably have selected the former, but better judgement has never been a strength.

The shame is not the racism itself, but your disingenuous, insufferable attempts to convince others that your views are not the product of deeply-held prejudices, lack of understanding and an absence of empathy. Are you, like Trump, the least racist person one would ever meet?

You seem to wear your "countless" Maori friends as a badge of pride and at the same time dismiss the injustices of the Crown as seemingly irrelevant since they happened "countless" years ago, while proclaiming support from "countless" citizens of Turanganui a Kiwa. This hyperbole and the ideas that drive it demonstrate the truth of the editor's point that in our community some conversations around historical truths are poorly understood.

Ani Bingham - 8 months ago
Well this is the 2nd letter that I have felt compelled to reply to of Mike Mulrooney.

The 1st was the 7.2.18 "What drives this renaming desire" and now "Hard-done-by excuse' carries no sway for many" 9.3.18. Both are equally delightful and refreshing to hear someone unashamedly say what they think without a racial bias from the past or present.
Facts are facts. As Mike said, we all have had hard times.
Some are blessed to have more support than others. But we all need to do the best we can with what we have. When opportunities come to better ourselves; take them; value them; value your life and others around you. No more blame games.
There are calculated risks involved in some of life's decisions. But we must step out and move on to the future, putting the old things that did not serve us well behind us, and be positive - make the most of this life we have!
Never before in our lives have humans had so much help available to us. Whatever age you are, there is somewhere that can give you advice and the extra push to achieve.
It is not our Maori, English, Scottish, German, Jewish, Irish, Australian heritage that makes our work decisions here in New Zealand. We all know the basics, even if we have disabilities, be they physical, or mental, there is help and a future in New Zealand.
So many white and coffee-coloured and black people have suffered, that is life. It is what they chose to do about the situations they found themselves in that moulded their lives from there on.
There is nothing wrong with the name of our area. Poverty Bay is our story, that is all.
Our - means all people. We all know there was right and wrong on both sides, if we have to speak of sides. It was all a very long time ago. Can we not just get along as one people and stop making excuses?

Poll

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    Do you support the call for a feasibility study into developing an "inland port" and sending the district's export logs to Napier Port by rail, to get log trucks out of the city and to repurpose the port and harbour area?