How to fill forestry jobs?

LETTER

It was good to see proper reporting of EIT’s withdrawal from wine training. Well done Annie Millton for showing us leadership and the implications. The article also mentioned for the first time in this paper that EIT has quit training in logging.

Last June letters discussed the need for another 400 forestry workers, starting last year, and what the Gisborne forest industry and tertiary sector leadership were doing about it. It was reported the two EIT forestry tutors had produced two new trainees for the workforce in the previous 12 months.

Due to the importance to the Gisborne economy of harvesting and replanting the extra forests, one letter suggested Eastland Wood Council “use the ‘Forestry for Life’ series to show each quarter, accurately, what each training organisation is achieving in terms of fully employed graduates (after 6 months employment, not just bums on seats) and what the EWC plan is for providing enough workers and how the plan is progressing”.

The EWC response letter said: “EWC recognises the need for a skilled workforce and, as production increases, that need becomes a priority. Hence we are focused on working together with training providers to achieve the right model along with continuing our work in promotion to change the perception of our industry to the community.”

Since last June there has been no reporting by EWC in “Forestry for Life” on any plan to address the issue and the ongoing results versus their plan (if one exists). Instead we hear four months late that 50 percent of Gisborne’s pre-entry training course capacity has quit, in an article about the wine industry!

Come on Eastland Wood Council, it’s still time to give the Kiwi forest owners expecting their trees to be harvested some regular real information, action, and reporting!

We have upped the port output by 20 percent in the past 12 months and now the in-forest workforce is stretched like a rubber-band. More stress is the last thing the existing workers need in this industry. All other New Zealand regions are facing the same increase in demand for workers to deal with the extra trees planted in the 1990s.

Local forester

New training programme to be piloted here​

Eastland Wood Council has not only identified that training in its current format is not delivering enough trainees but has been working very hard on a sustainable solution.
Over the past year we have been developing the Generation Programme, which aims to give a broader introduction to forestry, offer greater pastoral care of trainees, and place them with contractors for a mix of on-the-job training and off-site training still utilising existing training organisations.
Securing funding and working with the respective partners to ensure a robust model has taken time but with the recent Provincial Growth Funding announcement, the programme has gained momentum and we can move forward on implementation over the next six months. The programme will roll out as a pilot in Gisborne and progress will now mean we can have meaningful conversations with careers advisers, potential trainees, contractors and forestry companies in the near future.
Prue Younger, Eastland Wood Council chief executive

It was good to see proper reporting of EIT’s withdrawal from wine training. Well done Annie Millton for showing us leadership and the implications. The article also mentioned for the first time in this paper that EIT has quit training in logging.

Last June letters discussed the need for another 400 forestry workers, starting last year, and what the Gisborne forest industry and tertiary sector leadership were doing about it. It was reported the two EIT forestry tutors had produced two new trainees for the workforce in the previous 12 months.

Due to the importance to the Gisborne economy of harvesting and replanting the extra forests, one letter suggested Eastland Wood Council “use the ‘Forestry for Life’ series to show each quarter, accurately, what each training organisation is achieving in terms of fully employed graduates (after 6 months employment, not just bums on seats) and what the EWC plan is for providing enough workers and how the plan is progressing”.

The EWC response letter said: “EWC recognises the need for a skilled workforce and, as production increases, that need becomes a priority. Hence we are focused on working together with training providers to achieve the right model along with continuing our work in promotion to change the perception of our industry to the community.”

Since last June there has been no reporting by EWC in “Forestry for Life” on any plan to address the issue and the ongoing results versus their plan (if one exists). Instead we hear four months late that 50 percent of Gisborne’s pre-entry training course capacity has quit, in an article about the wine industry!

Come on Eastland Wood Council, it’s still time to give the Kiwi forest owners expecting their trees to be harvested some regular real information, action, and reporting!

We have upped the port output by 20 percent in the past 12 months and now the in-forest workforce is stretched like a rubber-band. More stress is the last thing the existing workers need in this industry. All other New Zealand regions are facing the same increase in demand for workers to deal with the extra trees planted in the 1990s.

Local forester

New training programme to be piloted here​

Eastland Wood Council has not only identified that training in its current format is not delivering enough trainees but has been working very hard on a sustainable solution.
Over the past year we have been developing the Generation Programme, which aims to give a broader introduction to forestry, offer greater pastoral care of trainees, and place them with contractors for a mix of on-the-job training and off-site training still utilising existing training organisations.
Securing funding and working with the respective partners to ensure a robust model has taken time but with the recent Provincial Growth Funding announcement, the programme has gained momentum and we can move forward on implementation over the next six months. The programme will roll out as a pilot in Gisborne and progress will now mean we can have meaningful conversations with careers advisers, potential trainees, contractors and forestry companies in the near future.
Prue Younger, Eastland Wood Council chief executive

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