Do we learn anything from history?

COLUMN

With concerns about the possibility of war with Russia, “it’s déjà vu all over again”, as Yogi Berra once said. That history comes so close to repeating itself is due to our inability to grasp the fact that the only thing we learn from history is that we learn nothing from it. Every lesson just disappears down a memory hole and is forgotten.

The present tense situation arises from an alleged poison gas attack by President Assad of Syria on his own people in Douma on April 7. The United States has expressed moral outrage at this “attack on innocent civilians”, and has responded with air strikes, despite having offered no concrete evidence that the Syrian government committed such attacks, or even that they occurred at all.

In any case, what possible motive could Assad have in attacking his own civilian population? It would, however, be offering the United States, with its track record of using concern for human rights to justify foreign interventions, a heaven-sent excuse to attack Syria.

The enemies of the Assad regime, on the other hand, would have a powerful motive; losing ground in the civil war, a gas attack — real or fabricated — would give the US the excuse to intervene.
Recent history provides plenty of support for such a “false flag” hypothesis. To give some of the most recent examples:

In 1964 the US began active involvement in Vietnam as a result of an alleged Gulf of Tonkin incident in which it was claimed that North Vietnamese boats attacked. In the following decade over 58,000 American servicemen and over a million Vietnamese lost their lives.

It has since been admitted that the “Tonkin incident” never occurred.

On October 10, 1990, just after Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait, 15-year-old Nayirah al-Sabah testified before the Congressional Human Rights Caucus that Saddam’s soldiers had taken babies out of incubators and left them to die on the floor. She cited no evidence, but it was enough to fire up Congress to give the authority to attack Iraq. It was later revealed that the girl was the daughter of the Kuwaiti Ambassador to the United States, and that she had been coached by Hill and Knowlton, the world’s largest public relations firm, to present fabricated evidence.

As a result of the 1991 Gulf War, over half a million Iraqis were killed.
And then there were the non-existent “weapons of mass destruction” (WMDs), used as justification for the American-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, in which an estimated half a million Iraqis died. Since there were no WMDs, the “evidence” that the Bush administration presented was clearly false.

So now we come to President Trump’s contrived outrage at the alleged gas attack in Syria. Even if the attack had been perpetrated by the Assad government, American “concern for human rights” would still be sickening; it was US companies that provided Saddam Hussein with the materials to make the poison gas for his attack on the Kurdish city of Halabja on March 16, 1988, killing between 3000 and 5000 Kurds and injuring 7000 to 10,000 more.
Joining these dots into a wider picture was a speech by General Wesley Clark at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on October 3, 2007. Talking about his audiobook A Time to Lead, he recalled that a few weeks after 9/11 he was told in the Pentagon by a senior general that the US intended to attack and destroy the governments of seven countries in five years: Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Iran.

In light of this, we need ask no further about the root cause of the refugee crisis in the Middle East.

With concerns about the possibility of war with Russia, “it’s déjà vu all over again”, as Yogi Berra once said. That history comes so close to repeating itself is due to our inability to grasp the fact that the only thing we learn from history is that we learn nothing from it. Every lesson just disappears down a memory hole and is forgotten.

The present tense situation arises from an alleged poison gas attack by President Assad of Syria on his own people in Douma on April 7. The United States has expressed moral outrage at this “attack on innocent civilians”, and has responded with air strikes, despite having offered no concrete evidence that the Syrian government committed such attacks, or even that they occurred at all.

In any case, what possible motive could Assad have in attacking his own civilian population? It would, however, be offering the United States, with its track record of using concern for human rights to justify foreign interventions, a heaven-sent excuse to attack Syria.

The enemies of the Assad regime, on the other hand, would have a powerful motive; losing ground in the civil war, a gas attack — real or fabricated — would give the US the excuse to intervene.
Recent history provides plenty of support for such a “false flag” hypothesis. To give some of the most recent examples:

In 1964 the US began active involvement in Vietnam as a result of an alleged Gulf of Tonkin incident in which it was claimed that North Vietnamese boats attacked. In the following decade over 58,000 American servicemen and over a million Vietnamese lost their lives.

It has since been admitted that the “Tonkin incident” never occurred.

On October 10, 1990, just after Saddam Hussein’s invasion of Kuwait, 15-year-old Nayirah al-Sabah testified before the Congressional Human Rights Caucus that Saddam’s soldiers had taken babies out of incubators and left them to die on the floor. She cited no evidence, but it was enough to fire up Congress to give the authority to attack Iraq. It was later revealed that the girl was the daughter of the Kuwaiti Ambassador to the United States, and that she had been coached by Hill and Knowlton, the world’s largest public relations firm, to present fabricated evidence.

As a result of the 1991 Gulf War, over half a million Iraqis were killed.
And then there were the non-existent “weapons of mass destruction” (WMDs), used as justification for the American-led invasion of Iraq in 2003, in which an estimated half a million Iraqis died. Since there were no WMDs, the “evidence” that the Bush administration presented was clearly false.

So now we come to President Trump’s contrived outrage at the alleged gas attack in Syria. Even if the attack had been perpetrated by the Assad government, American “concern for human rights” would still be sickening; it was US companies that provided Saddam Hussein with the materials to make the poison gas for his attack on the Kurdish city of Halabja on March 16, 1988, killing between 3000 and 5000 Kurds and injuring 7000 to 10,000 more.
Joining these dots into a wider picture was a speech by General Wesley Clark at the Commonwealth Club in San Francisco on October 3, 2007. Talking about his audiobook A Time to Lead, he recalled that a few weeks after 9/11 he was told in the Pentagon by a senior general that the US intended to attack and destroy the governments of seven countries in five years: Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Iran.

In light of this, we need ask no further about the root cause of the refugee crisis in the Middle East.

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Boo-Boo Bear - 3 months ago
I do wish that Mr Hanson would confine his navel gazing to the confines of his living room.
What the hell has my mate Yogi Bear got to do with it anyway?

Barbie Pauly, Auckland - 2 months ago
Trump rocks, end of story! (:D

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