Public in the dark on terminal waste

LETTER

Once again, with little public input, it has been decided that another Gisborne building needs millions of dollars thrown at it.

This time what is essentially a waiting room and baggage handling depot is to have a $12 million upgrade.

A provincial terminal that handles a few dozen passengers every day, unlike the big city ones catering for thousands.

In my book, the best airport terminal is one you can pass through quickly without having to hang around for hours — and this should be the prime aim of all involved.

As a “gateway” to Gisborne, the highways arriving at Makaraka cater to far more traffic — yet Makaraka has been ignored for years, and is long overdue for a “makeover”.

As the main entrance to Gisborne, Makaraka does not present any kind of visually appealing welcome to visitors; it has had no money spent on drains, footpaths, plantings, or any other improvements in more than 30 years. And there is still an unsealed chip dump bang smack in the middle which, along with a trucking firm just down the road, is a major source of dust and dirt.

Perhaps with the sestercentennial on our doorstep, Makaraka could get some attention?

Meanwhile, the plans for the airport terminal seem well-advanced, and once again include what appears to be a significant cultural enhancement.

Every one of the major building projects of recent times (exercises in ego-stroking in my view) has included a sizeable cultural component, involving the same cultural consultants.

I have also heard some worrying figures (innaccurate I hope!) bandied about regarding items such as the canoe over the council’s main door, where the building’s title should be.

I’m particularly interested to know how much our cultural consultants are getting out of ratepayers — and how much items like the three unnecessary adzes at the library entrance (supplied from outside) cost.

Why is the public seemingly being denied its right to play an effective part in major projects?

And why does it seem all the decisions have been made behind closed doors?

Roger Handford

Once again, with little public input, it has been decided that another Gisborne building needs millions of dollars thrown at it.

This time what is essentially a waiting room and baggage handling depot is to have a $12 million upgrade.

A provincial terminal that handles a few dozen passengers every day, unlike the big city ones catering for thousands.

In my book, the best airport terminal is one you can pass through quickly without having to hang around for hours — and this should be the prime aim of all involved.

As a “gateway” to Gisborne, the highways arriving at Makaraka cater to far more traffic — yet Makaraka has been ignored for years, and is long overdue for a “makeover”.

As the main entrance to Gisborne, Makaraka does not present any kind of visually appealing welcome to visitors; it has had no money spent on drains, footpaths, plantings, or any other improvements in more than 30 years. And there is still an unsealed chip dump bang smack in the middle which, along with a trucking firm just down the road, is a major source of dust and dirt.

Perhaps with the sestercentennial on our doorstep, Makaraka could get some attention?

Meanwhile, the plans for the airport terminal seem well-advanced, and once again include what appears to be a significant cultural enhancement.

Every one of the major building projects of recent times (exercises in ego-stroking in my view) has included a sizeable cultural component, involving the same cultural consultants.

I have also heard some worrying figures (innaccurate I hope!) bandied about regarding items such as the canoe over the council’s main door, where the building’s title should be.

I’m particularly interested to know how much our cultural consultants are getting out of ratepayers — and how much items like the three unnecessary adzes at the library entrance (supplied from outside) cost.

Why is the public seemingly being denied its right to play an effective part in major projects?

And why does it seem all the decisions have been made behind closed doors?

Roger Handford

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w gerrard - 6 months ago
Agree, another waste of money on a building that does not need it. As a ratepayer I am sick of the lack of transparency from our GDC.

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