Saddened by accusing tone, other interviews needed

LETTER

Re: Mangatu taonga returned home, March 18 story.

My family lived in Whatatutu from the early 1920s until the late 1950s. My father (a blacksmith) shod the horses from Mangamaia Station, my mother taught the Campbell boys at Whatatutu School and we Anderson children attended school with the younger Campbell children.

I do think I have a right of reply to the above-mentioned article, to help forestall it going down in history as the truth.

I am shocked and saddened by the accusing tone of the article. It certainly does not resonate with the harmonious relationship between Maori and Pakeha which we enjoyed in those early years and which continues to this day.

The comments “been taken” and “been stolen” are untrue and quite defamatory. “Taken from us by colonisation” is once again a case of accusation and blame without knowing the whole story.

The return of the taonga was instigated and facilitated by the Campbell family.

As children, we knew the story of the taonga — the rumours and counter-rumours. No need at all to call on the Treaty of Waitangi.

I am saddened also by the fact the article did not involve interviews with the elders, those who have the right to speak on the marae and who know how the Campbell family were respected by Maori and Pakeha alike.

The misinformation in this article must be halted in its tracks and must not be passed on in history! The Campbell family kehua are with us. Let us respect our memory of them.

Ruth Anderson, Melbourne

Re: Mangatu taonga returned home, March 18 story.

My family lived in Whatatutu from the early 1920s until the late 1950s. My father (a blacksmith) shod the horses from Mangamaia Station, my mother taught the Campbell boys at Whatatutu School and we Anderson children attended school with the younger Campbell children.

I do think I have a right of reply to the above-mentioned article, to help forestall it going down in history as the truth.

I am shocked and saddened by the accusing tone of the article. It certainly does not resonate with the harmonious relationship between Maori and Pakeha which we enjoyed in those early years and which continues to this day.

The comments “been taken” and “been stolen” are untrue and quite defamatory. “Taken from us by colonisation” is once again a case of accusation and blame without knowing the whole story.

The return of the taonga was instigated and facilitated by the Campbell family.

As children, we knew the story of the taonga — the rumours and counter-rumours. No need at all to call on the Treaty of Waitangi.

I am saddened also by the fact the article did not involve interviews with the elders, those who have the right to speak on the marae and who know how the Campbell family were respected by Maori and Pakeha alike.

The misinformation in this article must be halted in its tracks and must not be passed on in history! The Campbell family kehua are with us. Let us respect our memory of them.

Ruth Anderson, Melbourne

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