Facilitating cultural change

LETTER

Re: Kids choosing tech over playing.

International research shows that device use beyond one to two hours a week can put young children at an educational disadvantage. Primary students haven’t developed the basic building blocks of learning yet.

Recent research, such as what is happening in Lower Hutt, shows that device use at school, and recreational use of school devices at home, is cutting into other activities after school. It also shows that the most vulnerable children are more likely to be disadvantaged. Devices are used to entertain instead of playing.

With BYOD (bring your own device) policies encouraging more device use at school from the age of seven, children are having increasing access. It also creates peer pressure for families to buy devices, which they may not be able to afford or feel is not appropriate.

Schools are facilitating a cultural change, then telling parents that device use at home is a “parenting problem”.

A 2015 OECD report states that the best way to create equal opportunities in a digital world is by teaching a good standard of proficiency in reading, writing and maths.

In the rush to digitise the curriculum, schools and digital education programmes/strategies aren’t always considering the impact on education, health or communities. The Ministry of Education is also not providing this guidance.

What is the best amount of time to be on a device and achieve optimal education outcomes and not negatively affect children’s health and development?

Leanne Harrison

Re: Kids choosing tech over playing.

International research shows that device use beyond one to two hours a week can put young children at an educational disadvantage. Primary students haven’t developed the basic building blocks of learning yet.

Recent research, such as what is happening in Lower Hutt, shows that device use at school, and recreational use of school devices at home, is cutting into other activities after school. It also shows that the most vulnerable children are more likely to be disadvantaged. Devices are used to entertain instead of playing.

With BYOD (bring your own device) policies encouraging more device use at school from the age of seven, children are having increasing access. It also creates peer pressure for families to buy devices, which they may not be able to afford or feel is not appropriate.

Schools are facilitating a cultural change, then telling parents that device use at home is a “parenting problem”.

A 2015 OECD report states that the best way to create equal opportunities in a digital world is by teaching a good standard of proficiency in reading, writing and maths.

In the rush to digitise the curriculum, schools and digital education programmes/strategies aren’t always considering the impact on education, health or communities. The Ministry of Education is also not providing this guidance.

What is the best amount of time to be on a device and achieve optimal education outcomes and not negatively affect children’s health and development?

Leanne Harrison

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R2D2 - 4 months ago
Was this written by an artificially unintelligent BOT?

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