Not tangible tourism product

LETTER

Your editorial suggesting “Negative views will be proved wrong”, relating to the Navigations Project, will I believe long-term see you proved wrong, and the majority who voted in the negative proved right.

Problem is there is no way of measuring it. We will eventually know the cost, but will never know the true outcome of all those millions.

Advocates of the current Navigations Project and well-paid consultants talk of the project bringing over 10,000 visitors to Gisborne.

To the best of my knowledge there have only been two entities that have in a single marketing exercise (where the cost is known) brought into Gisborne in excess of 10,000 visitors (and still counting). They are the team from Rhythm and Vines with their concerts, and the Gisborne District councillors who voted the funds to bring in cruise ships. They were both good little earners and created employment. Proper tourism!

I sat on the original committee when the concept of the Navigations Project was first evaluated. Some of the original tourism plans did show great potential. I resigned when the project left being a tourism one creating employment and revenue, and turned into a social project. It was not tangible tourism product.

I ask you as the author of this editorial the very same question I asked the committee of the original Navigations Project in my resignation spiel: “Where and how are you going to clip the ticket.”

Frank Murphy, Motu

Your editorial suggesting “Negative views will be proved wrong”, relating to the Navigations Project, will I believe long-term see you proved wrong, and the majority who voted in the negative proved right.

Problem is there is no way of measuring it. We will eventually know the cost, but will never know the true outcome of all those millions.

Advocates of the current Navigations Project and well-paid consultants talk of the project bringing over 10,000 visitors to Gisborne.

To the best of my knowledge there have only been two entities that have in a single marketing exercise (where the cost is known) brought into Gisborne in excess of 10,000 visitors (and still counting). They are the team from Rhythm and Vines with their concerts, and the Gisborne District councillors who voted the funds to bring in cruise ships. They were both good little earners and created employment. Proper tourism!

I sat on the original committee when the concept of the Navigations Project was first evaluated. Some of the original tourism plans did show great potential. I resigned when the project left being a tourism one creating employment and revenue, and turned into a social project. It was not tangible tourism product.

I ask you as the author of this editorial the very same question I asked the committee of the original Navigations Project in my resignation spiel: “Where and how are you going to clip the ticket.”

Frank Murphy, Motu

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peter jones - 4 months ago
It is our version of hosting the Olympic Games. Ask Greece how that worked out. How will the talking heads justify this when they see what happens? As Frank says, it's a social project that funds the idealists at the expense of the masses.

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