Oil shocks will hit region hard

LETTER

Fuel prices are rising. More oil shocks have been predicted, and we remain unready to face a new age that is approaching rapidly.

Some may not have heard of “peak oil”. If so, I suggest Googling it up.

Alerts: This year Exxon Mobil has warned us to prepare for demand-driven oil shocks. Last year, Saudi Arabia’s energy minister Khalid A. Al-Falih warned us to expect an oil supply shortage by 2020.

When it hits, our region will be hard hit. We still lack a functioning rail link or coastal shipping facilities to offset any road transport problems.

Admittedly, the world is moving on to electric cars and bicycles, but heavy transport remains almost totally reliant on fossil fuels.

Oil unavailability or un-affordability will drive us to alternative energy, but before long it will be alternative everything.

Petroleum is part of nearly everything, even jobs.

Peak oil and its impacts have been delayed by shale oil and new drilling technologies such as fracking and horizontal drilling, along with deep sea and oil sand extraction, keeping us addicted to oil that much longer.

With millions of the world’s people homeless, lacking adequate food and clean water, ongoing fossil-fuel-use habits are now morally unacceptable.

The consequences of continuing as we do now are likely to be irreversible.

Using even 20 percent of the known, extractable fossil fuel reserves would jeopardise the basic necessities of human life.

The madness of it all.

Thank God we have a Government that sees the futility of searching for more of this product that threatens our future.

I want a world for our kids and grandkids. What about you?

Bob Hughes

Fuel prices are rising. More oil shocks have been predicted, and we remain unready to face a new age that is approaching rapidly.

Some may not have heard of “peak oil”. If so, I suggest Googling it up.

Alerts: This year Exxon Mobil has warned us to prepare for demand-driven oil shocks. Last year, Saudi Arabia’s energy minister Khalid A. Al-Falih warned us to expect an oil supply shortage by 2020.

When it hits, our region will be hard hit. We still lack a functioning rail link or coastal shipping facilities to offset any road transport problems.

Admittedly, the world is moving on to electric cars and bicycles, but heavy transport remains almost totally reliant on fossil fuels.

Oil unavailability or un-affordability will drive us to alternative energy, but before long it will be alternative everything.

Petroleum is part of nearly everything, even jobs.

Peak oil and its impacts have been delayed by shale oil and new drilling technologies such as fracking and horizontal drilling, along with deep sea and oil sand extraction, keeping us addicted to oil that much longer.

With millions of the world’s people homeless, lacking adequate food and clean water, ongoing fossil-fuel-use habits are now morally unacceptable.

The consequences of continuing as we do now are likely to be irreversible.

Using even 20 percent of the known, extractable fossil fuel reserves would jeopardise the basic necessities of human life.

The madness of it all.

Thank God we have a Government that sees the futility of searching for more of this product that threatens our future.

I want a world for our kids and grandkids. What about you?

Bob Hughes

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Martin Hanson - 2 months ago
Absolutely right. The belief that we can go on using finite resources indefinitely never ceases to amaze and depress me. And yet those of us who point out this reality are labelled cranks, doom-mongers or communists. I despair for our grandchildren.

Benjamindees, Hogwarts - 2 months ago
You leftists have plenty of timber and more resources per capita than almost anyone on the planet. Pick up a wrench and learn to build some minimal industry (without regulating it all to hell) and you'll be *better* off than the rest.

Niall Robertson, Auckland - 1 month ago
It appears to me that the only organisations in Gisborne opposing the use of rail are Eastland Group and Gisborne District Council. Most residents and business owners in the area would welcome rail to Gisborne. So would motorists of SH2 to Napier. The reason GDC opposes rail is that Eastland Group pays a Eastland Community Trust a dividend each year (nearly $10 million, if interest on $30m of capital notes are included, last year), and Eastland Group (which owns Gisborne's port) see rail as competition. Competition is what the local producers want/need in transport in this region, and Eastland Port is the most expensive in NZ. Rail could, perhaps lead to the Government going into a joint venture with Hikurangi Forest Farms to build a processing plant at Gisborne creating local jobs, and LeaderBrand would be more likely to expand their business in the region too. Truckers currently transporting goods to Napier would love to 'freight forward' this on to rail, saving wear and tear on their trucks, not to mention the roads. Allas, it seems that Eastland Group has the final say. I think that GDC needs to realise that the rail is not going to compete with the port for logs to Napier so much. Napier will soon have more logs than it will know what to do with. GDC also needs to consider if batting for Eastland Group isn't a conflict of interest, as it disadvantages so many other businesses in the Gisborne area, not to mention rail tourist groups wanting to bring tourists to Gisborne. With the link to Gisborne, a regional rail tour for foreign tourists is feasible. Without Gisborne, it is not. The people of Tairawhiti need to consider very seriously whether they should hold GDC to account, and get them to meet the needs of all businesses in the region, not just one.

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