Alternatives galore . . .

LETTER

I should have known a big-picture approach to this long-term problem would fetch short-term, small-picture responses.

Online, Methusela tells me the problem is not the plastic, it’s people and the way plastic is disposed of; that and “PC, liberal progressive nonsense”.

Mr Webb says I’m “long on rhetoric, short on ideas”.

N. Mead pulled me up on my statement that I lived a before-plastic childhood and that plastics had been invented in 1907. OK, lets call it my plastic-free childhood.

I’ll just say petroleum was discovered a century before plastic, but I can’t remember petroleum being part of our lives either. Our family was car-less and had no need for public transport. Maybe a little kerosene and little oil cans for our mum’s sewing machine and to keep our bikes running smoothly.

I’d better answer Murray’s original question about alternatives.

First, we all live in the same fossil fuel age and must share the guilt.

I replied to one of his criticisms of attendances to the oil protests of 2010. I used no fossil fuel to attend any of the oil huis — Opotiki included. My mode of transport in each case was bicycle.

I walk the walk on this issue as well, and I steal his phrase — my efforts are “as far from single-use as you could get”. On this issue, joining with Christine Allen, I’m also up for the challenge.

There are alternatives galore. We don’t use plastic bin liners. Newspaper is always on hand for doggie poos. We very rarely purchase liquids in plastic — we take our refillable containers to Bulk Barn. Meat from the village butcher is wrapped in paper. Very little first-time plastic for discarding or recycling stems from our place.

Call it annoying or a broken record if you like. I repeat: Let’s get serious about dealing with today’s plastic problem.

Bob Hughes

I should have known a big-picture approach to this long-term problem would fetch short-term, small-picture responses.

Online, Methusela tells me the problem is not the plastic, it’s people and the way plastic is disposed of; that and “PC, liberal progressive nonsense”.

Mr Webb says I’m “long on rhetoric, short on ideas”.

N. Mead pulled me up on my statement that I lived a before-plastic childhood and that plastics had been invented in 1907. OK, lets call it my plastic-free childhood.

I’ll just say petroleum was discovered a century before plastic, but I can’t remember petroleum being part of our lives either. Our family was car-less and had no need for public transport. Maybe a little kerosene and little oil cans for our mum’s sewing machine and to keep our bikes running smoothly.

I’d better answer Murray’s original question about alternatives.

First, we all live in the same fossil fuel age and must share the guilt.

I replied to one of his criticisms of attendances to the oil protests of 2010. I used no fossil fuel to attend any of the oil huis — Opotiki included. My mode of transport in each case was bicycle.

I walk the walk on this issue as well, and I steal his phrase — my efforts are “as far from single-use as you could get”. On this issue, joining with Christine Allen, I’m also up for the challenge.

There are alternatives galore. We don’t use plastic bin liners. Newspaper is always on hand for doggie poos. We very rarely purchase liquids in plastic — we take our refillable containers to Bulk Barn. Meat from the village butcher is wrapped in paper. Very little first-time plastic for discarding or recycling stems from our place.

Call it annoying or a broken record if you like. I repeat: Let’s get serious about dealing with today’s plastic problem.

Bob Hughes

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Poll

  • Voting please wait...
    Your vote has been cast. Reloading page...
    ​Do you think Gladstone Road Bridge should have its concrete parapet walls converted to steel railings on one or both of its sides as part of the upgrade and widening under way?

    See also:

    Opinion: