Why destroy local history?

LETTER

I was appalled to see an online article from my hometown Gisborne regarding the removal of the statue and proposed destruction of the lovely brickwork on top of Kaiti Hill. Both have been there a long time.

Who made the decision for removal and was it made with a Gisborne vote? Or was it done by a few loud voices with the usual non-opposition from the local population? I suspect the latter.

Perhaps the minority of local Maori who oppose the statue may like to erect their own statue next to Captain Cook; wouldn’t this be more balanced, logical and cost-effective?

Why destroy something that is now historical to Gisborne? It does after all overlook the first sighting of Young Nicks Head, and so a statue acknowledging this is a good thing.

Let’s not let the voices of a few destroy what I feel is now part of Gisborne history.

As for the lovely curved brickwork; we should remember those locals who built it — there is history there as well.

For goodness sake, where are your voices Gisborne people? It is OK to voice an opinion and it is both shameful and disappointing that you do not do so.

Margaret Linton (nee Paley), Myanmar

I was appalled to see an online article from my hometown Gisborne regarding the removal of the statue and proposed destruction of the lovely brickwork on top of Kaiti Hill. Both have been there a long time.

Who made the decision for removal and was it made with a Gisborne vote? Or was it done by a few loud voices with the usual non-opposition from the local population? I suspect the latter.

Perhaps the minority of local Maori who oppose the statue may like to erect their own statue next to Captain Cook; wouldn’t this be more balanced, logical and cost-effective?

Why destroy something that is now historical to Gisborne? It does after all overlook the first sighting of Young Nicks Head, and so a statue acknowledging this is a good thing.

Let’s not let the voices of a few destroy what I feel is now part of Gisborne history.

As for the lovely curved brickwork; we should remember those locals who built it — there is history there as well.

For goodness sake, where are your voices Gisborne people? It is OK to voice an opinion and it is both shameful and disappointing that you do not do so.

Margaret Linton (nee Paley), Myanmar

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Weary Whiteman - 2 months ago
I'd enjoy having them both. Heck, put them facing each other to commemorate the meeting of both groups.
We're all just so tired of being told that prior generations did wrong by other prior generations and having to pay for it, despite us (ourselves personally) not being the ones who did wrong. For some reason everything stayed very "Old Testament" regarding making the sons pay for the sins of the fathers.
I was born here yet am told because of the colour of my skin I'm somehow less of a local than someone else the same age as me who was born here. It's infuriating, to say the least.
Recognise both histories and stop this whole "us and them" mentality, it's just stupid. We're all born in the same country. Get on with life.

Troy - 2 months ago
Half the population in Gisborne are Maori and there is more than a minority who are happy to see the statue go. And let's not forget a lot of Maori history in Gisborne has been destroyed too or ignored, and to this day still is.

G R Webb - 2 months ago
Troy, in the spirit of co-operation, partnership and understanding, why is it necessary to remove the vestiges of Captain Cook? There is plenty of room on Titirangi for both views to be displayed.

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