We live in exciting times

LETTER

Re: Keep the Cook Plaza and statue, October 2 column.

The writer is either sincerely ignorant or deliberately exhibiting attention-seeking behaviour using generalities to promote bigoted, hateful and hurtful social engineering dogma.

The assumptions he makes are that the status quo is immovable, change must be resisted, and history is only relevant when seen through the monocultural lenses of the power-holding majority.

Whether he and others like him accept it or not, change is here globally, nationally, and locally. We live in exciting times of inspired technical and scientific advancement not seen before by humankind.

As well, debates over women’s rights, climate change, assisted dying, the LGBT movement, indigenous peoples’ rights, poverty, unemployment, affordable housing, equitable pay — all are catalysts for change driven by the present and future generations, who are not afraid to accept and overcome these challenges.

The writer is right about one thing. He needs to look into his own interior life, and the answer to a balanced view of culture and race he is desperately seeking is glaringly obvious.

Wally Te Ua

Re: Keep the Cook Plaza and statue, October 2 column.

The writer is either sincerely ignorant or deliberately exhibiting attention-seeking behaviour using generalities to promote bigoted, hateful and hurtful social engineering dogma.

The assumptions he makes are that the status quo is immovable, change must be resisted, and history is only relevant when seen through the monocultural lenses of the power-holding majority.

Whether he and others like him accept it or not, change is here globally, nationally, and locally. We live in exciting times of inspired technical and scientific advancement not seen before by humankind.

As well, debates over women’s rights, climate change, assisted dying, the LGBT movement, indigenous peoples’ rights, poverty, unemployment, affordable housing, equitable pay — all are catalysts for change driven by the present and future generations, who are not afraid to accept and overcome these challenges.

The writer is right about one thing. He needs to look into his own interior life, and the answer to a balanced view of culture and race he is desperately seeking is glaringly obvious.

Wally Te Ua

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Bob Hughes - 15 days ago
I?m with Wally and commend his all-inclusive focus of issues and his consideration of the necessary changes and future generations.
Mr Jorian said ?Cook?s landing here in the Endeavour certainly improved lives and standards of living?.
He has made an assumption that the imposing of European civilisation standards on this country has benefited Maori. How on Earth do you judge that?
One thing I am sure of is that had European settlement not occurred here, this country would have been more pristine and bountiful ? with the original life forms on land and in the sea and air.
From what I?ve learned, I guarantee pre-European Maori culture was far more respectful to nature than the we are now. Sadly we can?t turn that clock back.
I am, however, in full agreement with Mr Jorion?s comment about the ?balanced intermingling of all races? ? this is important.
So let?s first focus on what?s of greatest importance, and work together for the benefit of all now and in the future.

G R Webb - 14 days ago
What a lot of waffle Bob. One thing is for sure - had Cook not landed here you wouldn't be around. Your judgment about a pristine and beautiful environment ignores the 249 years that have passed since Cook landed. Are you suggesting that the indigenous people of the time, left undisturbed, would have kept things the same way? Rather a bold assumption. But the guts of all this is that we are chucking out the bath and the bath water. Shortly the revisionists will have their way so that Cook and his exploits will be expunged from the local scene. Pity. There is a film about to be shown locally. Tupaia's Endeavour. Really? There is room on Titirangi for Cook, the Plaza and the stories and recollections which Ngati Oneone rightfully wish to tell. What has been decided is hardly acting in accordance with the partnership obligations under the Treaty.

Bob Hughes - 14 days ago
For Gordon. Our differing opinions won't change the reality that human occupation has hugely altered nature's balance in Aotearoa/New Zealand. I stick firmly to my view that pre-European Maori culture was more respectful to nature. Also, without European influence and settlement, this land would be in a far a more pristine state. We may not be able to change the past but, with a more balanced view of culture and greater unity, we can combine to contribute to a better future.

G R Webb - 14 days ago
Bob, your assessment of how pre-European might have treated the environment are as subjective as they are hypothetical. They get disqualified on both counts. Incidentally, when did you last see a live moa? While your wish to combine to a better future is noble, the recent steps decided on are likely to alienate a substantial section of the populous that you want to move forward.

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