Challenge now to work for common good

LETTER

Re: October 8 feature spread “The Endeavour in Turanganui”.

Thank you Anne for the informative, factual, balanced, mega-view of what took place when James Cook and his company arrived in Turanganui-a-Kiwa. Also, your overview of what already existed here before he set foot on this whenua. As you pointed out, local history was not taught in our schools when I went through the system 60 years ago.

Also quite compelling are the prophetic remarks Joseph Banks made in his journal regarding the shooting of tangata whenua; this and subsequent early European settlement and domination of the district by the settler culture and dispossession of tangata whenua. For me herein lies the root cause of today’s underlying tensions between tikanga rua (our two cultures).

The good news is that some of us are openly engaging and trying hard to listen and not to talk past each other — something that will need to be nurtured and ongoing, well beyond next year’s event.

I congratulate the organisers of “First Korero” and all those who participated in these events.

The challenge now for the rest of us is to take heed of our dual heritage, warts and all, to work for the common good, and to make our rohe (hometown) a place of peace and prosperity where our humane commonalities far outweigh our human differences.

Wally Te Ua

Re: October 8 feature spread “The Endeavour in Turanganui”.

Thank you Anne for the informative, factual, balanced, mega-view of what took place when James Cook and his company arrived in Turanganui-a-Kiwa. Also, your overview of what already existed here before he set foot on this whenua. As you pointed out, local history was not taught in our schools when I went through the system 60 years ago.

Also quite compelling are the prophetic remarks Joseph Banks made in his journal regarding the shooting of tangata whenua; this and subsequent early European settlement and domination of the district by the settler culture and dispossession of tangata whenua. For me herein lies the root cause of today’s underlying tensions between tikanga rua (our two cultures).

The good news is that some of us are openly engaging and trying hard to listen and not to talk past each other — something that will need to be nurtured and ongoing, well beyond next year’s event.

I congratulate the organisers of “First Korero” and all those who participated in these events.

The challenge now for the rest of us is to take heed of our dual heritage, warts and all, to work for the common good, and to make our rohe (hometown) a place of peace and prosperity where our humane commonalities far outweigh our human differences.

Wally Te Ua

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Lloyd Gretton, China - 2 months ago
Did Maori in 1769 have any faults?

Pat - 2 months ago
Well said Wally!

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