A week of living hell for my family and I

LETTER

Re: Blessed with our hospital, October 25 letter.

In 2011 I had surgery for a double hernia done by Dr Klaus Platt. Last Thursday I had another hernia procedure and was discharged home the following day.

After experiencing high pain I went to see a GP on Wednesday who immediately referred me to ED for an acute admission.

An assessment was made and I was told I would go in for surgery later that evening. This was cancelled at 10.30pm and rebooked for Thursday.

On Thursday morning a doctor said I could go home and wait for four to six weeks on painkillers to see if it would ease up: or have the surgery. My wife and I elected to have surgery.

At 2.30pm I was getting anxious as theatre time usually ends around 5pm.

I rang the house manager who came to see me. At this stage I was an emotional wreck. She contacted theatre and I arrived in the pre-op airlock just after 3.30pm.

At 4.10pm a theatre manager came to tell me: “You won’t like what I am going to say but we have cancelled your surgery.” Another higher priority operation took my place.

I was taken back to the ward shattered. I rang Jim Green and the duty manager, both were unavailable. What should I do? Enough was enough, I self-discharged.

This has been a week of living hell for my family and I. I have never been so humiliated, abused, and disrespected. I have gone without food, water, sleep, have high pain, and experienced episodic PTSD neurosis.

To the writer of the October 25 letter, my experiences as noted are considerably different. After 20 years as a chaplain in the public and private heathcare system in Oz and NZ, now a retiree, I am bewildered at what happened to me.

Wally Te Ua

Re: Blessed with our hospital, October 25 letter.

In 2011 I had surgery for a double hernia done by Dr Klaus Platt. Last Thursday I had another hernia procedure and was discharged home the following day.

After experiencing high pain I went to see a GP on Wednesday who immediately referred me to ED for an acute admission.

An assessment was made and I was told I would go in for surgery later that evening. This was cancelled at 10.30pm and rebooked for Thursday.

On Thursday morning a doctor said I could go home and wait for four to six weeks on painkillers to see if it would ease up: or have the surgery. My wife and I elected to have surgery.

At 2.30pm I was getting anxious as theatre time usually ends around 5pm.

I rang the house manager who came to see me. At this stage I was an emotional wreck. She contacted theatre and I arrived in the pre-op airlock just after 3.30pm.

At 4.10pm a theatre manager came to tell me: “You won’t like what I am going to say but we have cancelled your surgery.” Another higher priority operation took my place.

I was taken back to the ward shattered. I rang Jim Green and the duty manager, both were unavailable. What should I do? Enough was enough, I self-discharged.

This has been a week of living hell for my family and I. I have never been so humiliated, abused, and disrespected. I have gone without food, water, sleep, have high pain, and experienced episodic PTSD neurosis.

To the writer of the October 25 letter, my experiences as noted are considerably different. After 20 years as a chaplain in the public and private heathcare system in Oz and NZ, now a retiree, I am bewildered at what happened to me.

Wally Te Ua

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lloyd gretton - 19 days ago
A bit faulty on the grammar there, Wally. I is the subject pronoun. When the pronoun is object or linked with a preposition, the correct pronoun is me. If the money for "Treaty settlements" had gone into health care, Wally might have got immediate treatment as happened to me in the past few weeks in China. In China, if reports are true, the authorities have put a million Moslem seperatists into re-education camps.

Also on the list - 19 days ago
I'm sorry, Father Te Ua, that your surgery was cancelled for that day. You and I will never know what exactly it was, this "Higher Priority Operation" . . . it may have been an emergency Caesarean delivery, saving the lives of a baby and mother, it may have been a perforated appendix, it could have been a traumatic injury . . . but it would not have been a decision made casually.

When my own hernia surgery was delayed the second time, I was frustrated and disappointed, as I also experienced constant high pain. I had made arrangements, taken leave, and had to cancel it the following morning. That was a little embarrassing, the second time.

While it was time-consuming, spending two days in pre-op, tagged, marked and prepped, I didn't find the experience humiliating, abusive or disrespectful. Boring and tedious, but not distressing - such kind, polite staff.

I'm not sure how you come to feel you have been humiliated, abused, or disrespected, as I do not see how having a surgery delayed for another person's emergency procedure would do this.

I do hope you have your surgery this week, and the pain you are in is relieved.