No second chance here

LETTER

Our daughter was involved in drugs and at the end of 2014 was arrested. She came before the courts in 2016 and was sentenced to home detention.

She is an intelligent, educated and personable young woman with a good employment history pre-2014. She has applied for many jobs in Gisborne in the past few years and been granted interviews where she has truthfully disclosed her conviction at the start. In many instances she has been interviewed for up to an hour and the interviewer has spoken very positively and enthusiastically about employing her, but when her application is sent to head office it is an instant rejection.

Depressingly, time and time again, these businesses do not have the courtesy to contact her and inform her that she has not been successful.

Her criminal record will likely haunt her for the rest of her life in one way or another. She has changed her behaviour, she is desperate to rejoin the workforce, but no one is prepared to give her that second chance.

How long can someone keep their spirits up in the face of constant rejection?

Her story is one of many throughout New Zealand. People want to prove that they can change, that they can contribute to society, but is anyone willing to take the risk of employing someone with a criminal record?

Sadly, in Gisborne, the answer is no.

Heartbroken parents

Our daughter was involved in drugs and at the end of 2014 was arrested. She came before the courts in 2016 and was sentenced to home detention.

She is an intelligent, educated and personable young woman with a good employment history pre-2014. She has applied for many jobs in Gisborne in the past few years and been granted interviews where she has truthfully disclosed her conviction at the start. In many instances she has been interviewed for up to an hour and the interviewer has spoken very positively and enthusiastically about employing her, but when her application is sent to head office it is an instant rejection.

Depressingly, time and time again, these businesses do not have the courtesy to contact her and inform her that she has not been successful.

Her criminal record will likely haunt her for the rest of her life in one way or another. She has changed her behaviour, she is desperate to rejoin the workforce, but no one is prepared to give her that second chance.

How long can someone keep their spirits up in the face of constant rejection?

Her story is one of many throughout New Zealand. People want to prove that they can change, that they can contribute to society, but is anyone willing to take the risk of employing someone with a criminal record?

Sadly, in Gisborne, the answer is no.

Heartbroken parents

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Say No To Drugs - 15 days ago
Seven years clean slate. Try again in 2023. It's packhouse and fieldwork for you until then. Moral of the story, don't do drugs kids.

Recruiter - 10 days ago
A criminal record follows a person along to interviews and the like and seems to sit in the corner like a big, scary monster. I see this monster on an almost daily basis in my industry, but I am a firm believer that people change and learn from their history. If I can see a person has actively been trying to implement change in their life, they have had no subsequent re-offending and if they are honest and upfront with me from the very beginning (and right for the role I have) then I will give them a chance. For all I know they could be the most amazing person I ever employ in my career.
I truly hope your daughter gets the opportunity to get back into the workforce soon and all this negativity doesn't send her backwards down the path to the monster in the corner. Kia Kaha