Forgetting to honour our boys?

LETTER

Re: Amistice Day icon unlit . . . November 2 letter.

It is so disturbing to see the GDC neglecting Kaiti Hill and saying they want to pull down Cook’s statue and the plaza, and not lighting up the World War 1 memorial.

This letter writer says: “The street lights at the city lookout and Cook’s Plaza have not worked for several years, despite several excuses having been advanced by the council.”

Shame on Gisborne District Council. It is hard to fathom their mindset.

Wandering down the track to the memorial, I read the words that follow: “To our boys who died in the Great War or were found willing to save the Empire. Erected by their friends, January 1923.”

These words speak volumes. Our soldiers died for us as one people, one nation. Why are they disrespected now?

This is dear to me, having a grandfather who was gassed by the Germans in the Somme and died prematurely. His job was to sneak up in the night and find where the enemy was hiding. I have his medal for bravery, it has Napoleon on it.

When representatives from the city of Le Quesnoy visited Gisborne, invited by Monty Soutar, who went there, I was French to English and English to French interpreter for our Mayor, dignitaries and the French Ambassador. So I am connected to this.

To end, a powerful quote from outside C Company House: “We will lose some of the most promising of our young leaders, but we will gain the respect of our Pakeha brothers.” (Sir Apirana Ngata, 1940.)

Alain Jorian

Re: Amistice Day icon unlit . . . November 2 letter.

It is so disturbing to see the GDC neglecting Kaiti Hill and saying they want to pull down Cook’s statue and the plaza, and not lighting up the World War 1 memorial.

This letter writer says: “The street lights at the city lookout and Cook’s Plaza have not worked for several years, despite several excuses having been advanced by the council.”

Shame on Gisborne District Council. It is hard to fathom their mindset.

Wandering down the track to the memorial, I read the words that follow: “To our boys who died in the Great War or were found willing to save the Empire. Erected by their friends, January 1923.”

These words speak volumes. Our soldiers died for us as one people, one nation. Why are they disrespected now?

This is dear to me, having a grandfather who was gassed by the Germans in the Somme and died prematurely. His job was to sneak up in the night and find where the enemy was hiding. I have his medal for bravery, it has Napoleon on it.

When representatives from the city of Le Quesnoy visited Gisborne, invited by Monty Soutar, who went there, I was French to English and English to French interpreter for our Mayor, dignitaries and the French Ambassador. So I am connected to this.

To end, a powerful quote from outside C Company House: “We will lose some of the most promising of our young leaders, but we will gain the respect of our Pakeha brothers.” (Sir Apirana Ngata, 1940.)

Alain Jorian

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

JOHN PORTER - 3 days ago
... and for another perspective on the subject, read The Guardian article below:

"How colonial violence came home: the ugly truth of the first world war."
The Great War is often depicted as an unexpected catastrophe. But for millions who had been living under imperialist rule, terror and degradation were nothing new. By Pankaj Mishra

https://www.theguardian.com/news/2017/nov/10/how-colonial-violence-came-home-the-ugly-truth-of-the-first-world-war?CMP=share_btn_fb