Nationalist threat to global climate action

LETTER

The most important world event of this year is now under way. The 2018 UN COP24 conference on climate change began in Katowice, Poland on December 3.

But there’s bad news; the COP22 promises in Paris to drastically reduce carbon output or risk ecosystem collapse have not been honoured. The shameful facts are that greenhouse gas concentrations have actually increased since 2015, and countries have fallen woefully short of their emissions reduction goals.

Every fraction of a degree of warming makes a difference, says WMO Deputy Secretary General Elena Manaenkova.

Here are some blatant examples of democracies not playing ball:

US President Donald Trump responded last week to a report by his own government warning of devastating effects from climate change by saying: “I don’t believe it.”

Donald Trump is the first US president since 1941 to not have a science adviser. Even half a century ago, in 1965, President Lyndon Johnson took climate change seriously.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Australia would not be spending money on climate change conferences and “all that nonsense”.

Brazil’s newly-elected right-wing climate sceptic leader Jair Bolsonaro has abdicated his country’s role, even withdrawing its offer to host next year’s climate talks.

Britain also has taken its eye off the climate change ball. A move towards Brexit would negate UK watchdog power to enforce climate policy.

I reckon that democracy has sold us out to corruption and greed.

The four big counties dragging the chain share common ground — their people have all elected conservative (right-wing), nationalist governments into power.

I also fear the trend of ultra-right parties gaining support around the world.

Climate change denial is strongly linked to right-wing nationalism. The regular right-minded flak I cop on this page over my climate action endeavours also confirms this.

Before we load all the blame on political will, remember democratic right-wing leadership comes through popular vote. The voting public must share guilt. Resistance to climate change action goes with the package.

More later.

Bob Hughes

The most important world event of this year is now under way. The 2018 UN COP24 conference on climate change began in Katowice, Poland on December 3.

But there’s bad news; the COP22 promises in Paris to drastically reduce carbon output or risk ecosystem collapse have not been honoured. The shameful facts are that greenhouse gas concentrations have actually increased since 2015, and countries have fallen woefully short of their emissions reduction goals.

Every fraction of a degree of warming makes a difference, says WMO Deputy Secretary General Elena Manaenkova.

Here are some blatant examples of democracies not playing ball:

US President Donald Trump responded last week to a report by his own government warning of devastating effects from climate change by saying: “I don’t believe it.”

Donald Trump is the first US president since 1941 to not have a science adviser. Even half a century ago, in 1965, President Lyndon Johnson took climate change seriously.

Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison said Australia would not be spending money on climate change conferences and “all that nonsense”.

Brazil’s newly-elected right-wing climate sceptic leader Jair Bolsonaro has abdicated his country’s role, even withdrawing its offer to host next year’s climate talks.

Britain also has taken its eye off the climate change ball. A move towards Brexit would negate UK watchdog power to enforce climate policy.

I reckon that democracy has sold us out to corruption and greed.

The four big counties dragging the chain share common ground — their people have all elected conservative (right-wing), nationalist governments into power.

I also fear the trend of ultra-right parties gaining support around the world.

Climate change denial is strongly linked to right-wing nationalism. The regular right-minded flak I cop on this page over my climate action endeavours also confirms this.

Before we load all the blame on political will, remember democratic right-wing leadership comes through popular vote. The voting public must share guilt. Resistance to climate change action goes with the package.

More later.

Bob Hughes

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G R Webb - 10 days ago
On what principle is it that, when we see nothing but improvement behind us, we are to expect nothing but deterioration before us?

Bob Hughes - 10 days ago
To Gordon's comment, I ask where is the improvement behind us? Only evidence of depleting natural resources, rapidly changing ecosystems, species decline and the accelerating sixth mass extinction . . . all brought on by human activity.
The principle all caring folk should pursue is to act collectively to slow and reverse the processes our waywardness has triggered.

Mike Smith, Katowice, Poland - 10 days ago
Spot on Bob.

John Fricker - 10 days ago
All your opening paragraphs tell us is that the game is up with non-existent climate change, well done UK, USA, Brazil and Australia. I was going to write more but am in stitches having just read your claim to being right-minded in the penultimate paragraph.
You do make me chuckle Mr Hughes. More later? No thanks.

Martin Hanson - 8 days ago
At least Joe Fone has attempted to put some flesh on the points he was trying to make. John Fricker's comment would be of more interest if he gave reasons for his belief that climate change is 'non-existent'. To give him something to work on, does he think that climate scientists expressing concern about global warming are (a) incompetent or (b) lying, and can he provide evidence?
John Fricker has put himself on record as supporting the stance of the USA, Australia and Brazil, the last of which has announced plans to remove all restriction on cutting down what remains of the Amazon rain forest.

Peter Jones - 1 day ago
I fear that my good mate Bob Hughes has become UN hinged. Wants to live in Islamabad and be looked after by the state. I hear you Bob but I'm disagreeing with you for the good of your grandchildren.

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