Stunning tree sorely missed

LETTER

I am so upset at the felling of the stunning old gum tree on the riverbank heading over the Waipaoa bridge.

That huge, lone tree was spectacular. It was made for the sunsets that silhouetted it on the skyline in the evenings. It made our drive home after work and school a little bit happier each day.

This local landmark was cut down with no warning or consultation. Just so sad.

There is a hole there now, adding to our bland, treeless landscape that so many seem to want in this region.

That gum wasn’t native but it was beautiful and was home to many birds and insects.

Even if it has been removed for the flood scheme upgrade, it was not on the top of the stop bank, it was down the side — surely it could have been worked around.

I would like to see some plan put in place for native tree and shrub plantings along the outside of the enlarged stop banks; the perfect time to do it would be when the work has been freshly done.

Can someone advise if any plantings are planned?

Upset local

Footnote from GDC senior project engineer Joss Ruifrok:

It is now best practice to remove trees that are growing beside or on our stopbanks. The roots of trees and shrubs, and trees toppled by wind, can create pathways for water during flood events which then could lead to a stopbank failure. Such a failure could cause significant flooding and risk to life.

Stopbanks are only replanted with grass as a dense sward of grass forms an integral structural part of the stopbank, by protecting the underlying stopbank soil from being eroded by flood waters.

I am so upset at the felling of the stunning old gum tree on the riverbank heading over the Waipaoa bridge.

That huge, lone tree was spectacular. It was made for the sunsets that silhouetted it on the skyline in the evenings. It made our drive home after work and school a little bit happier each day.

This local landmark was cut down with no warning or consultation. Just so sad.

There is a hole there now, adding to our bland, treeless landscape that so many seem to want in this region.

That gum wasn’t native but it was beautiful and was home to many birds and insects.

Even if it has been removed for the flood scheme upgrade, it was not on the top of the stop bank, it was down the side — surely it could have been worked around.

I would like to see some plan put in place for native tree and shrub plantings along the outside of the enlarged stop banks; the perfect time to do it would be when the work has been freshly done.

Can someone advise if any plantings are planned?

Upset local

Footnote from GDC senior project engineer Joss Ruifrok:

It is now best practice to remove trees that are growing beside or on our stopbanks. The roots of trees and shrubs, and trees toppled by wind, can create pathways for water during flood events which then could lead to a stopbank failure. Such a failure could cause significant flooding and risk to life.

Stopbanks are only replanted with grass as a dense sward of grass forms an integral structural part of the stopbank, by protecting the underlying stopbank soil from being eroded by flood waters.

Your email address will not be published. Comments will display after being approved by a staff member. Comments may be edited for clarity.

Are you serious? - 7 days ago
There are lots of trees in our place, find a new, sound one to love.

Murray Jones, Gold Coast - 6 days ago
Go to Google Maps, navigate to the Waipaoa River Bridge. Take a screen shot of said tree and set it as your background/wallpaper. You'll at least have a picture of it.
Or go here and save them:
https://ibb.co/nzGRfdJ
https://ibb.co/4tXNKyZ
https://ibb.co/c3h3hxK


So how long had the tree been growing there just waiting to create pathways for water?
It would have given a number of years worth of firewood to some lucky person/people.

Marcia, Picton - 3 days ago
Thank you for this beautiful photo of this wonderful gum tree near the Waipaoa bridge. It is a shame it had to go. Being ex Gizzy I do appricate your sentiments. It is now my screen shot.