Dual heritage approach

LETTER

Kia ora Clive, please don’t be alarmed.

It’s important not to view funding decisions in isolation of the broader national or historical context. As you will appreciate better than most, the journey to dual heritage requires attention to gaps in our national knowledge — which I am sure funders realise.

I must also hasten to point out that, in running our monthly programme, we have found the stories of Horouta waka, of Paoa and Kiwa, have been extraordinarily popular amongst the community from all walks of life — Maori, Pakeha, young and old. The fact that every month these events are sold out speaks volumes about this community’s growing appetite to share and understand each other’s stories.

And while we are a few weeks off releasing the detailed October commemorations programme, it is now widely understood that we will host and have an opportunity to engage with a full flotilla of waka and tall ships in an exciting week-long programme — a dual heritage approach in action.

Look forward to seeing you for a cuppa sometime soon.

Glenis Philip-Barbara, Te Ha 2019 Sestercentennial Trust general manager

Kia ora Clive, please don’t be alarmed.

It’s important not to view funding decisions in isolation of the broader national or historical context. As you will appreciate better than most, the journey to dual heritage requires attention to gaps in our national knowledge — which I am sure funders realise.

I must also hasten to point out that, in running our monthly programme, we have found the stories of Horouta waka, of Paoa and Kiwa, have been extraordinarily popular amongst the community from all walks of life — Maori, Pakeha, young and old. The fact that every month these events are sold out speaks volumes about this community’s growing appetite to share and understand each other’s stories.

And while we are a few weeks off releasing the detailed October commemorations programme, it is now widely understood that we will host and have an opportunity to engage with a full flotilla of waka and tall ships in an exciting week-long programme — a dual heritage approach in action.

Look forward to seeing you for a cuppa sometime soon.

Glenis Philip-Barbara, Te Ha 2019 Sestercentennial Trust general manager

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Clive Bibby - 5 months ago
Kia ora Glenis
Thankyou for responding to my comments.
It would be a mistake to see my column as a criticism of the plans that have emerged or are to be published in the future.
I respect your integrity and appreciate the excellent work that has been completed to date under your watch. I say as much in my next column that will hopefully be published sometime next week.
However, in your response to my enquiries, you continue to ignore the main thrust
of my concerns which is that the announced project plans and funding allocations for the October celebrations appear to be heavily weighted in support of the tangata whenua part of our dual heritage story.
I have always recognised that our multi-cultural history has two main equally important components, both requiring significant funding for project planning and development work.
I begrudge not a cent, in fact totally support the amounts allocated to the projects announced todate.
My concerns are entirely limited to finding out more about the funds presumably allocated to projects designed to highlight the European contribution to the development of our modern society as a balance to what we are told is already in the pipeline.
In the absence of announcements of projects in the planning stage that have a bias towards the other half of our dual heritage story, those concerns will remain and in fact lead to assumptions that the entire planning process has been a one-sided exercise that will benefit no one. My real worry is that those announcements will not be made because the projects don't exist.
Hope you can oblige Glenis. Show me that my concerns are unjustified.

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