Like all art, it’s subjective

LETTER

Re: Surf sculpture’s up.

That is such a disappointing sculpture, and it cost $75,000!

The best solution would have been to get three old Bob Davie nine feet six inch surfboards instead, which would be a great memorial to him, Alan Byrne and all the surfing legends who have graced our community for decades.

If the artist is a surfer he is well out of touch, and the trustees have let all the surfers down badly as well.

Tear that sculpture down and replace it with three of Bob’s surfboards. Then visitors to Gisborne would recognise immediately what it is supposed to represent.

Trevor Mills

Seventy-five thousand dollars for a surf “sculpture”?! Nine bits of rusty metal. Talk about riding a great wave!

Now I know Gisborne’s gone mad.

I do hope for that price it’s got Wipeout and Good Vibrations playing out of hidden speakers in the base.

Roger Handford

I love the surf sculpture and also love to see funding that was pre-allocated for exactly this sort of work going to a local artist instead of some talented tourist.

Our arts community has traditionally been terribly underfunded (and usually work for food stamps), so I’ll join with them in celebrating this small win: Go the artists!

But like all art, it’s totally subjective — you hate it, I love it . . . I’m OK with that, but as a local surfer I love the meaning of the piece and the legendary people this work represents.

I wonder how much Napier spent on their waterfront sculptures? Try buying a custom-made contemporary art sculpture in NY or Paris . . . $75k’s a bargain for some people’s work.

I just wish we could value our people in the same way, and focus on their positive contribution to our community. The money was donated for this exact purpose, so it’s not really a mis-spend or a waste!

Ryan Ragget

Re: Surf sculpture’s up.

That is such a disappointing sculpture, and it cost $75,000!

The best solution would have been to get three old Bob Davie nine feet six inch surfboards instead, which would be a great memorial to him, Alan Byrne and all the surfing legends who have graced our community for decades.

If the artist is a surfer he is well out of touch, and the trustees have let all the surfers down badly as well.

Tear that sculpture down and replace it with three of Bob’s surfboards. Then visitors to Gisborne would recognise immediately what it is supposed to represent.

Trevor Mills

Seventy-five thousand dollars for a surf “sculpture”?! Nine bits of rusty metal. Talk about riding a great wave!

Now I know Gisborne’s gone mad.

I do hope for that price it’s got Wipeout and Good Vibrations playing out of hidden speakers in the base.

Roger Handford

I love the surf sculpture and also love to see funding that was pre-allocated for exactly this sort of work going to a local artist instead of some talented tourist.

Our arts community has traditionally been terribly underfunded (and usually work for food stamps), so I’ll join with them in celebrating this small win: Go the artists!

But like all art, it’s totally subjective — you hate it, I love it . . . I’m OK with that, but as a local surfer I love the meaning of the piece and the legendary people this work represents.

I wonder how much Napier spent on their waterfront sculptures? Try buying a custom-made contemporary art sculpture in NY or Paris . . . $75k’s a bargain for some people’s work.

I just wish we could value our people in the same way, and focus on their positive contribution to our community. The money was donated for this exact purpose, so it’s not really a mis-spend or a waste!

Ryan Ragget

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Amber Dunn - 2 months ago
"The critic who doesn't like your work is correct... The critic who says that no one else will like your work is wrong." Trevor, you are dead wrong when you say "the trustees have let all the surfers down badly". I'm a surfer, and I love it! Ryan Ragget loves it, too. This surfing sculpture, and the meaning embedded in it, was dreamt up by our very own legendary surfer Gail Patty (1967 NZ Women Surfing Champion) who has endorsed it from beginning to end. There is a deeper story to this sculpture - what you can't see is very important. I'm sure Gail (or Paulus) would happily share it with you. I'd recommend you attend the opening so you get to hear this story, including the connection to Bob Davie and the evolution of surfing and surfboard design that came after him. Furthermore, you'll come to understand that our brilliant local artist, Paulus McKinnon, is fully in touch with our surfing history and our beautiful sport. I am full of gratitude, and have a huge "thank you", for the Art in Public Places trustees who raised the funding for this sculpture. Their tireless efforts made the dream of one of our first women surfers, Gail Patty, a reality: an icon of modern-day surfing, at its birthplace - Roberts Road - designed by a local surfer and artist.

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