Cancer frustrations grow

LETTER

Re: Non-smoker battling lung cancer, July 24 story.

Firstly, thank you to The Gisborne Herald for exposing all these sad stories.

Thank you to Megan Kelso for her support with her letter “Bring Pharmac into the 21st century”.

And thank you of course to Julie Robinson, who is frustrated like so many of us in this country — cancer sufferers who are struck by the biggest killer of all cancers for unexplained reasons.

Myself, I am close to giving up trying in vain for the NZ Lung Foundation to get the latest immunopherapy drugs available to us all.

The Government of the day is in power when these drugs have become essential. Prior to this it was unknown; trials have now proven that these drugs can produce miracles by boosting the immune system. Pharmac’s direction in New Zealand is the problem.

I have watched on TV “How to not get cancer” and it showed that insecticides and other poisons are likely to be among the causes of cancer. So many countries around the world have banned the worst of them, saying they are almost certainly carcinogenic (cancer forming).

I have a list of 50 countries around the world that do use insecticides, but have different food preferences. Good food speaks volumes. Here are a few examples of the high-cancer countries and those that have much fewer cancer cases per 100,000 people:

1. Australia 468 people; 2. New Zealand 438.1; 3. Ireland 373.7; 4. Hungary 368.1; 5. USA 352.2 . . .

40th. Martinique 250.8; 41. Malta 249.4; 42. Singapore 248.9; 3. Japan 248.0; 50th and last Israel 233.6.

Other countries that have low cancer rates are Iceland, Puerto Rico, Moldova, Poland, Cyprus, Austria and French Polynesia.

To me it stands out that the low cancer rates are where poisons are not in people’s food. Nations where people eat good, non-fattening food like seafood and vegetables show far lower cancer rates.

While Australia and New Zealand both have a massive problem with cancer, Australia does fund these wonder drugs.

Alain Jorion

(Stage 4 lung cancer, non-smoker)

Re: Non-smoker battling lung cancer, July 24 story.

Firstly, thank you to The Gisborne Herald for exposing all these sad stories.

Thank you to Megan Kelso for her support with her letter “Bring Pharmac into the 21st century”.

And thank you of course to Julie Robinson, who is frustrated like so many of us in this country — cancer sufferers who are struck by the biggest killer of all cancers for unexplained reasons.

Myself, I am close to giving up trying in vain for the NZ Lung Foundation to get the latest immunopherapy drugs available to us all.

The Government of the day is in power when these drugs have become essential. Prior to this it was unknown; trials have now proven that these drugs can produce miracles by boosting the immune system. Pharmac’s direction in New Zealand is the problem.

I have watched on TV “How to not get cancer” and it showed that insecticides and other poisons are likely to be among the causes of cancer. So many countries around the world have banned the worst of them, saying they are almost certainly carcinogenic (cancer forming).

I have a list of 50 countries around the world that do use insecticides, but have different food preferences. Good food speaks volumes. Here are a few examples of the high-cancer countries and those that have much fewer cancer cases per 100,000 people:

1. Australia 468 people; 2. New Zealand 438.1; 3. Ireland 373.7; 4. Hungary 368.1; 5. USA 352.2 . . .

40th. Martinique 250.8; 41. Malta 249.4; 42. Singapore 248.9; 3. Japan 248.0; 50th and last Israel 233.6.

Other countries that have low cancer rates are Iceland, Puerto Rico, Moldova, Poland, Cyprus, Austria and French Polynesia.

To me it stands out that the low cancer rates are where poisons are not in people’s food. Nations where people eat good, non-fattening food like seafood and vegetables show far lower cancer rates.

While Australia and New Zealand both have a massive problem with cancer, Australia does fund these wonder drugs.

Alain Jorion

(Stage 4 lung cancer, non-smoker)

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