Lending weight to reform

LETTER

I read Wally Te Ua’s recent letter regarding indigenous representation on local bodies, etc. This resonated with me, as I find myself part of a rapidly growing group of people who suffer from a similar lack of a voice in the decision-making process. I refer of course to that great, grey, balding “geezerhood”, (as some people rather rudely call us) — old folks. We are becoming a much larger segment of the population.

We have suffered through a harsh regime of vicious corporal punishment, at school. We have been battered by the vicissitudes of a fluctuating economy. We represent long years of noses to the grindstone, shoulders to the wheel, making our country great and warming our bare feet in cowpats on the way to school, in a less-kind climate. All this with a touch of nostalgia and foreboding as we progress through our golden years, assisted by the various prostheses we have accrued on our journey. We struggle with social media and technology. Things are not the way they used to be! I demand answers, but unfortunately have forgotten the questions.

I lend my ever-increasing weight, somewhat offset by my failing strength, to a programme of reform. Surely we have earned the right to “zimmer” off into the sunset, assured that our voice is being heard?

Ron Taylor

I read Wally Te Ua’s recent letter regarding indigenous representation on local bodies, etc. This resonated with me, as I find myself part of a rapidly growing group of people who suffer from a similar lack of a voice in the decision-making process. I refer of course to that great, grey, balding “geezerhood”, (as some people rather rudely call us) — old folks. We are becoming a much larger segment of the population.

We have suffered through a harsh regime of vicious corporal punishment, at school. We have been battered by the vicissitudes of a fluctuating economy. We represent long years of noses to the grindstone, shoulders to the wheel, making our country great and warming our bare feet in cowpats on the way to school, in a less-kind climate. All this with a touch of nostalgia and foreboding as we progress through our golden years, assisted by the various prostheses we have accrued on our journey. We struggle with social media and technology. Things are not the way they used to be! I demand answers, but unfortunately have forgotten the questions.

I lend my ever-increasing weight, somewhat offset by my failing strength, to a programme of reform. Surely we have earned the right to “zimmer” off into the sunset, assured that our voice is being heard?

Ron Taylor

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Mixed Metaphors et al - 12 days ago
I can't help but wonder if it is at all possible to keep one's nose to the grindstone whilst simultaneously shouldering the wheel.
Perhaps Mr Taylor is a contortionist. He is certainly a person who enjoys a frequent dollop of self denigration.

Murray Jones, Gold Coast - 11 days ago
What is a mixed metaphor?

It's when you mix two or more separate metaphors into one.

Example: "Let's burn that bridge when we come to it."

An idiom shouldn't be confused with a metaphor and a metaphor shouldn't be confused with a mixed metaphor, otherwise a no-named author who is taking a potshot at someone will come across as someone who has swapped the m for a t.

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