Translation of ‘possession’

LETTER

Wally Te Ua (August 8 letter) presents a very dubious argument when he chooses to base it on “Tino rangatiratanga (Maori self-determination)”, which is a perversion of the meaning of the Treaty of Waitangi.

“Tino rangatiratanga” was Henry Williams’ translation of Hobson’s “possession”, in the absence of any Maori term for rights to personal property, accepted by all, Maori and others alike, at Waitangi.

It was moreover guaranteed to “tangata katoa o Nu Tirani”, that is “ALL the people of New Zealand”.

The cause of justice and fairness is not served by anybody making false claims to the contrary, with invented modern meanings today.

Bruce Moon, Nelson

Wally Te Ua (August 8 letter) presents a very dubious argument when he chooses to base it on “Tino rangatiratanga (Maori self-determination)”, which is a perversion of the meaning of the Treaty of Waitangi.

“Tino rangatiratanga” was Henry Williams’ translation of Hobson’s “possession”, in the absence of any Maori term for rights to personal property, accepted by all, Maori and others alike, at Waitangi.

It was moreover guaranteed to “tangata katoa o Nu Tirani”, that is “ALL the people of New Zealand”.

The cause of justice and fairness is not served by anybody making false claims to the contrary, with invented modern meanings today.

Bruce Moon, Nelson

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Manu Caddie - 8 days ago
The cause of justice and fairness is not served by anybody like Mr Moon quoting Te Tiriti and claiming to be an authority on the translation of Te Reo Maori when they overlook actual expert translations like that of Sir Hugh Kawharu and the version included in the first schedule to the Treaty of Waitangi Act 1975 (the basis for all subsequent jurisprudence on the subject including Waitangi Tribunal decisions) and uses the following translation for the relevant section of Article Two:
"Her Majesty the Queen of England confirms and guarantees to the Chiefs and Tribes of New Zealand and to the respective families and individuals thereof the full exclusive and undisturbed possession of their Lands and Estates Forests Fisheries and other properties which they may collectively or individually possess so long as it is their wish and desire to retain the same in their possession..."

Lloyd Gretton, Auckland - 8 days ago
In the Maori bible, published in 1835, tino rangatira is mentioned twice. One each for the Kingdom of Heaven, and the Roman Empire. The Maori chiefs therefore understood it as supreme power, but a spiritual and legal power. They understood it to mean their supreme Christian and temporal authority over their tribes but not over the British settlements.

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