A day to remember, and reflect

LETTER

Monday, October 28 is Ra Maumahara (day of pain and shame), a day set aside by the Government to reflect on the Land Wars and in our case see and understand how this has negatively impacted on Turanga iwi past and present.

In 2017 Tuhoe received an apology from the Crown for the invasion of and brutal dismantling of Rua Kenana’s pacifist community at Maungapohatu. The bill formalising the apology passed its first reading in Parliament last month.
On Thursday Parliament passed the third reading of a bill formalising an apology by the Crown for the invasion and harsh treatment of the pacifist community at Parihaka led by Te Whiti and Tohu.

With the expression of regret by the British Government leading up to Tuia 250 for the killing of Te Maro, Te Rakau and others still fresh in our memories, next Monday is a good time for us to remember what happened in our own backyard at Waerenga-a-Hika, Matawhero and Ngatapa.

What can we as a community, as Treaty partners, both Maori and Pakeha do together to reconcile our violent past and clash of cultures which still lingers on today in the hearts and minds of many of us?

If the current mood of the Government, exemplified by changing public opinion, is anything to go by an apology would be a good place to start on the journey towards forgiveness and reconciliation in Turanga — it will take time, but common sense and goodwill on both sides will surely prevail.

Wally Te Ua

Monday, October 28 is Ra Maumahara (day of pain and shame), a day set aside by the Government to reflect on the Land Wars and in our case see and understand how this has negatively impacted on Turanga iwi past and present.

In 2017 Tuhoe received an apology from the Crown for the invasion of and brutal dismantling of Rua Kenana’s pacifist community at Maungapohatu. The bill formalising the apology passed its first reading in Parliament last month.
On Thursday Parliament passed the third reading of a bill formalising an apology by the Crown for the invasion and harsh treatment of the pacifist community at Parihaka led by Te Whiti and Tohu.

With the expression of regret by the British Government leading up to Tuia 250 for the killing of Te Maro, Te Rakau and others still fresh in our memories, next Monday is a good time for us to remember what happened in our own backyard at Waerenga-a-Hika, Matawhero and Ngatapa.

What can we as a community, as Treaty partners, both Maori and Pakeha do together to reconcile our violent past and clash of cultures which still lingers on today in the hearts and minds of many of us?

If the current mood of the Government, exemplified by changing public opinion, is anything to go by an apology would be a good place to start on the journey towards forgiveness and reconciliation in Turanga — it will take time, but common sense and goodwill on both sides will surely prevail.

Wally Te Ua

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